POS AMP3DP3Yfalse0001823945The statutory rate presented is using the U.S. federal corporate tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2021, and the UBT rate for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019.Presented net of $8.0 million of tenant improvement allowance and reflects the impact of a $4.8 million rent holiday period on certain leases.(1) Represents share consideration issued to the Dyal Capital selling shareholders based on the fair value of the acquired business, reflecting a discount for lack of control.(2) Includes cash consideration paid to reimburse seller for certain pre-acquisition expenses.(3) The TRA and Earnout Securities represent contingent consideration. See Note 9 for additional information on the valuation of these instruments. (4) Goodwill represents the amount of total consideration in excess of net identifiable assets acquired. None of the goodwill recognized is expected to be deductible by the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships for tax purposes.(4) Goodwill represents the amount of total consideration in excess of net identifiable assets acquired. None of the goodwill recognized is expected to be deductible by the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships for tax purposes.(1) Represents Common Units issued to Oak Street selling shareholders, reflecting a discount for lack of marketability.(2) Includes cash consideration paid to reimburse seller for certain pre-acquisition expenses.(3) Represent the fair value of contingent cash consideration payable to certain sellers upon the occurrence of certain Oak Street Triggering Events as defined below. The amount presented does not include contingent cash and equity payments subject to the same Oak Street Triggering Events that were deemed to be compensation, rather than consideration, as further discussed below. See Note 9 for additional information on the valuation of this liability.(4) Goodwill represents the amount of total consideration in excess of net identifiable assets acquired. 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Table of Contents
As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 21, 2022
Registration
No. 333-257190
 
 
 
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
 
POST-EFFECTIVE AMENDMENT NO. 1
to
FORM
S-1
REGISTRATION STATEMENT
UNDER
THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933
 
 
BLUE OWL CAPITAL INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
 
 
Delaware
 
6282
 
86-3906032
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(Primary Standard Industrial
Classification Code Number)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
399 Park Avenue
38th Floor
New York, NY 10022
(212)
419-3000
(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of registrant’s principal executive offices)
 
 
Neena A. Reddy
399 Park Avenue
38th Floor
New York, NY 10022
(212)
419-3000
(Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)
 
 
Copies of all communications, including communications sent to agent for service, should be sent to:
Philippa Bond, P.C.
H. Thomas Felix
Kirkland & Ellis LLP
2049 Century Park East
37th Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90067
+1 (310)
552-4200
 
 
Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public
: From time to time after this Registration Statement becomes effective.
If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933 check the following box:  ☒
If this form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

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If this form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐
If this form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a
non-accelerated
filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule
12b-2
of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer      Accelerated filer  
Non-accelerated filer
     Smaller reporting company  
         Emerging growth company  
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act. ☐
 
 
The registrant hereby amends this registration statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this registration statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until this registration statement shall become effective on such date as the SEC, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.
 
 
 

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EXPLANATORY NOTE
On July 15, 2021, the registrant filed a Registration Statement on Form
S-1
(Registration
No. 333-257190),
which was subsequently declared effective by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on August 2, 2021 (the “Registration Statement”). This post-effective amendment is being filed to update the Registration Statement to include information contained in the registrant’s Annual Report on Form
10-K
and certain other information in such Registration Statement.
No additional securities are being registered under this post-effective amendment. All applicable registration fees were paid at the time of the original filing of the Registration Statement.

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The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.
 
SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED APRIL 21, 2022
PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS
 
BLUE OWL CAPITAL INC.
1,320,591,340 CLASS A SHARES
 
 
This prospectus relates to: (i) 159,964,103 shares of Class A common stock, par value $0.0001 per share (“Class A Shares”), that were issued by us under the Business Combination Agreement, dated as of December 23, 2020 (as the same has been or may be amended, modified, supplemented or waived from time to time, the “BCA” or the “Business Combination Agreement”), by and among Altimar Acquisition Corporation (“Altimar”), Owl Rock Capital Group LLC (“Owl Rock Group”), Owl Rock Capital Feeder LLC (“Owl Rock Feeder”), Owl Rock Capital Partners LP (“Owl Rock Capital Partners”) and Neuberger Berman Group LLC (“Neuberger”) to the former equityholders of Owl Rock Group (the “Owl Rock Equityholders”), the former equityholders (the “Dyal Equityholders”) of the Dyal Capital Partners division of Neuberger (“Dyal”), Altimar Sponsor LLC (“Altimar Sponsor”) and the former directors of Altimar, (ii) 617,093,768 Class A Shares issued upon the exchange of Common Units (as defined below) and the cancellation of an equal number of shares of Class C common stock, par value $0.0001 per share (“Class C Shares”), issued to former Electing Owl Rock Equityholders and Electing Dyal Equityholders (each as defined below), (iii) 294,656,373 Class A Shares issued upon the sale of shares of Class B common stock, par value $0.0001 per share (“Class B Shares”), issuable to the Owl Rock Principals and Dyal Principals (each as defined herein) upon the exchange of Common Units and the cancellation of an equal number of shares of Class D common stock, par value $0.0001 per share (“Class D Shares”), (iv) 14,954,302 Class A Shares issued in respect of the Seller Earnout Shares (as defined herein) upon the satisfaction of certain vesting conditions, (v) 59,447,040 Class A Shares issuable to certain Owl Rock Equityholders and Dyal Equityholders upon the exchange of Common Units and the cancellation of an equal number of Class C Shares, which were issued in respect of the Seller Earnout Units upon the satisfaction of certain vesting conditions, and (vi) 24,475,754 Class A Shares issuable upon the sale of Class B Shares issuable to the former Owl Rock Principals and Dyal Principals upon the exchange of Common Units and the cancellation of an equal number of Class D Shares which were issued in respect of the Seller Earnout Units upon the satisfaction of certain vesting conditions.
This prospectus also relates to the offer and sale from time to time by the selling stockholders who purchased shares in the subscription agreements dated as of December 23, 2020 (collectively, the “PIPE Investors” and, together with the Owl Rock Equityholders, the Dyal Equityholders and Altimar Sponsor, the “Selling Holders”) of 150,000,000 Class A Shares. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of Class A Shares by the Selling Holders pursuant to this prospectus; however, we will bear all costs, expenses and fees in connection with the registration of the securities and will not receive any proceeds from the sale of the securities. The Selling Holders will bear all commissions and discounts, if any, attributable to their respective sales of the securities.
Our registration of the securities covered by this prospectus does not mean that either we or the Selling Holders will issue, offer or sell, as applicable, any of the Class A Shares. The Selling Holders may offer and sell the securities covered by this prospectus in a number of different ways and at varying prices. We provide more information about how the Selling Holders may sell the shares in the section entitled “
Plan of Distribution
.”
You should read this prospectus and any prospectus supplement or amendment carefully before you invest in our Class A Shares.
Our Class A Shares are listed on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the symbols “OWL”. On April 20, 2022, the closing price of our Class A Shares was $14.33 per share.
 
 
Investing in our securities involves risks that are described in the “Risk Factors” section beginning on page
21
of this prospectus.
Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of the securities to be issued under this prospectus or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
The date of this prospectus is                , 2022.

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F-1
 
You should rely only on the information contained in this prospectus. No one has been authorized to provide you with information that is different from that contained in this prospectus. This prospectus is dated as of the date set forth on the cover hereof. You should not assume that the information contained in this prospectus is accurate as of any date other than that date.
 
i

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MARKET AND INDUSTRY DATA
This prospectus includes market and industry data and forecasts from independent consultant reports, publicly available information, various industry publications, other published industry sources and our internal data, estimates and forecasts. Independent consultant reports, industry publications and other published industry sources generally indicate that the information contained therein was obtained from sources believed to be reliable.
Our internal data, estimates and forecasts are based upon information obtained from our investors, partners, trade and business organizations and other contacts in the markets in which we operate and our management’s understanding of industry conditions. While we are not aware of any misstatements regarding any market, industry or similar data presented herein, such data involves risks and uncertainties and is subject to change based on various factors, including those discussed under the heading “Risk Factors” in this prospectus.
TRADEMARKS AND TRADE NAMES
We own or have rights to trademarks, service marks, copyrights and trade names that we use in conjunction with the operation of our business. This prospectus also includes trademarks, service marks and trade names of other companies. Each trademark, tradename or service mark of any other company appearing in this prospectus is, to our knowledge, owned by such other company.
 
ii

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SELECTED DEFINITIONS
This prospectus has been prepared using a number of stylistic conventions, which you should consider when reading the information herein or therein. Unless otherwise expressly stated or, unless the context otherwise requires, references in this prospectus to:
 
   
Adjusted EBITDA
”, a
non-GAAP
measure, is used to assess the Company’s ability to service its borrowings. Adjusted EBITDA is derived from and reconciled to, but not equivalent to, its most directly comparable GAAP measure of net income (loss) before income taxes. Adjusted EBITDA represents Distributable Earnings plus (a) interest expense, (b) income tax expense (benefits), and (c) depreciation and amortization.
 
   
Adjusted Revenues
” a
non-GAAP
measure, is used to assess the net revenue expected to be received by the Company. Adjusted Revenues are derived from and reconciled to, but not equivalent to its most directly comparable GAAP measure of total revenues, net. Adjusted Revenues differ from total revenues computed in accordance with GAAP as it excludes reimbursed expenses and dealer manager revenues, if applicable, that have an offsetting amount included within expenses on the consolidated and combined statement of operations.
 
   
Adjusted Compensation
”, a
non-GAAP
measure, is used to assess the net cash settled compensation to be paid by the Company. Adjusted Compensation is derived from and reconciled to, but not equivalent to its most directly comparable GAAP measure of compensation and benefits. Adjusted Compensation differs from compensation and benefits computed in accordance with GAAP as it excludes equity compensation expense and compensation and benefits reimbursed through the receipt of administrative revenues. The administrative revenues reflect allocable compensation and expenses incurred by certain professionals of the Company and reimbursed by products managed by the Company.
 
   
Advisers Act
” refers to the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended, and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder.
 
   
Altimar
” refers to Altimar Acquisition Corporation, a blank check company incorporated as a Cayman Islands exempted company.
 
   
Altimar Founders
” refers to Altimar Sponsor and certain equityholders of Altimar.
 
   
Altimar Sponsor
” refers to Altimar Sponsor LLC, a Delaware limited liability company.
 
   
assets under management
” or “
AUM
” refers to the assets that we manage, and are generally equal to the sum of (i) net asset value (“NAV”); (ii) drawn and undrawn debt; (iii) uncalled capital commitments; and (iv) total managed assets for certain Real Estate products.
 
   
AUM not yet paying fees
” refers to AUM that is not currently paying fees and is eligible to earn management fees and/or performance income upon deployment.
 
   
available capital
” (also referred to as “dry powder”) is comprised of uncalled committed capital (including commitments to products that have yet to commence their investment periods); cash and cash equivalents; and, for certain funds and accounts permitting leverage, undrawn debt (at the product-level including certain amounts subject to restrictions).
 
   
BCA
” or “
Business Combination Agreement
” refers to the Business Combination Agreement, dated as of December 23, 2020 (as amended by that Amendment to Business Combination Agreement, dated as of January 4, 2021, Second Amendment to Business Combination Agreement, dated as of March 25, 2021, and Third Amendment to Business Combination Agreement, dated as of April 11, 2021, as the same has been or may be further amended, modified, supplemented or waived from time to time in accordance with its terms), by and among Altimar, Owl Rock Capital Group LLC, Owl Rock Feeder, Owl Rock Capital Partners and Neuberger.
 
   
BDC
” refers to a business development company, as regulated under the Investment Company Act.
 
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Blue Owl,
” “
Company
,” “
Registrant
,” “
our
,” “
we
” or “
us
” refers to Blue Owl Capital Inc., a Delaware corporation and the combined company following the consummation of the Business Combination, and its consolidated subsidiaries.
 
   
Blue Owl Carry
” refers to Blue Owl Capital Carry LP, a Delaware limited partnership.
 
   
Blue Owl Carry Units
” refers to the limited partnership interests in Blue Owl Carry.
 
   
Blue Owl GP
” refers collectively to Blue Owl Capital Holdings GP LLC and Blue Owl Capital GP LLC, each a Delaware limited liability company, directly or indirectly wholly-owned subsidiary of Blue Owl that hold Blue Owl’s interests in the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships.
 
   
Blue Owl Holdings
” refers to Blue Owl Capital Holdings LP, a Delaware limited partnership.
 
   
Blue Owl Holdings Units
” refers to the limited partnership interests in Blue Owl Holdings.
 
   
Blue Owl Limited Partnership Agreements
” refers to the amended and restated limited partnership agreements of Blue Owl Carry and Blue Owl Holdings, as the same may be amended, modified, supplemented or waived from time to time in accordance with their terms.
 
   
Blue Owl Operating Group
” refers collectively to the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships and their consolidated subsidiaries.
 
   
Blue Owl Operating Group Unit
” refers collectively to a unit in each of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships.
 
   
Blue Owl Operating Partnerships
” refers to Blue Owl Carry and Blue Owl Holdings, collectively.
 
   
Board
” refers to Blue Owl’s board of directors.
 
   
Business Combination
” refers to the transactions contemplated by the BCA.
 
   
Business Combination Date
” refers to May 19, 2021.
 
   
Business Securities
” refers Blue Owl Securities LLC (formerly, Owl Rock Capital Securities LLC).
 
   
Business Services Platform
” refers to the Dyal Capital team that provides strategic services to partner managers.
 
   
Capital Commitments
” refers to the commitments to our funds, including BDCs, as applicable, and the commitments of Dyal Capital, Owl Rock and our respective affiliates.
 
   
carried interest
” or “
carried interest allocations
” refers to, in carry fund structures, the allocation of gain or profit to the general partner or another affiliated entity or entities of amounts otherwise allocable to the limited partners, commonly referred to as carried interest, as defined in the fund’s investment management or partnership agreements (excluding, for the sake of clarity, incentive fees). Carried interest is typically calculated for a given fund based on cumulative fund performance. Carried interest entitles the general partner (or an affiliate) to a special allocation of income and gains from a fund, and is typically structured as a net profits interest in the applicable fund. Carried interest is generally calculated on a “realized” basis and the recipient is generally entitled to a carried interest based upon the net realized income and gains often taking into account certain unrealized losses generated by such fund. Net realized income/gains or loss is not netted between or among funds.
 
   
Class
 A Shares
” refers to the Class A common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of the Company.
 
   
Class
 B Shares
” refers to the Class B common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of the Company.
 
   
Class
 C Shares
” refers to the Class C common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of the Company.
 
   
Class
 D Shares
” refers to the Class D common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of the Company.
 
   
Class
 E Shares
” refers to the Class E common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of the Company.
 
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Class
 E-1
Shares
” refers to the
Class E-1
common stock of the Company. The Series
E-1
Class E Shares had a Class E Triggering Event on July 21, 2021, which occurred when the volume weighted-average price of a Class A Share exceeded $12.50 for 20 consecutive trading days, at which time 7,495,432 Class E Shares were converted into an equal number of Class A Shares.
 
   
Class
 E-2
Shares
” refers to the
Class E-2
common stock of the Company. The Series
E-2
Class E Shares had a Class E Triggering Event on November 3, 2021, which occurred when the volume weighted-average price of a Class A Share exceeded $15.00 for 20 consecutive trading days, at which time 7,495,432 Class E Shares were converted into an equal number of Class A Shares.
 
   
Closing
” refers to the closing of the Business Combination.
 
   
common stock
” refers to the Class A Shares, the Class B Shares, the Class C Shares and the Class D Shares, , collectively.
 
   
DE
” refers to Distributable earnings, a
non-GAAP
measure, which is used to assess performance and amounts available for dividends to members. DE is derived from and reconciled to, but not equivalent to its most directly comparable GAAP measure of net income (loss) before income taxes. Distributable Earnings is FRE less current income taxes and includes (other than with respect to Owl Rock) net realized gains, realized performance income and performance related compensation. DE differs from income before taxes computed in accordance with GAAP as it adjusts for certain items that we believe are indicative of our ability to make our dividend payments. Our presentation of DE represents our operating performance, as further adjusted for performance income and performance related compensation, as applicable. Management believes that these adjustments enable investors to better understand the Company’s earnings that are available for distribution.
 
   
DGCL
” refers to the Delaware General Corporation Law, as amended.
 
   
Direct Lending
” refers to our Direct Lending products, which offer private credit solutions to middle-market companies through four investment strategies: diversified lending, technology lending, first lien lending and opportunistic lending. Direct Lending products are managed by the Owl Rock division of Blue Owl.
 
   
dollars
” or “$” refers to U.S. dollars.
 
   
Domestication
” refers to the continuation of Altimar by way of domestication of Altimar into a Delaware corporation, with the ordinary shares of Altimar becoming shares of common stock of the Delaware corporation under the applicable provisions of the Cayman Islands Companies Act (2020 Revision) of the Cayman Islands, as the same may be amended from time to time, and the DGCL; the term includes all matters and necessary or ancillary changes in order to effect such Domestication, including the adoption of our certificate of incorporation consistent with the DGCL and changing the name and registered office of Altimar.
 
   
Dyal Capital
” refers the Dyal Capital Partners business, which was acquired from Neuberger Berman Group LLC in connection with the Business Combination, and is now a division of Blue Owl.
 
   
Dyal Equity Funds
” refers to existing funds within the GP Minority Equity Investments strategy: Dyal Capital Partners (A) LP, Dyal Capital Partners (B) LP and Dyal Investment Partners LP and their related feeder, blocker, parallel, alternative investment and holding entities (“Dyal Fund I”); Dyal Capital Partners II (A) LP, Dyal Capital Partners II (B) LP and Dyal II Investment Partners LP and their related feeder, blocker, parallel, alternative investment and holding entities (“Dyal Fund II”), Dyal Capital Partners III (A) LP and Dyal Capital Partners III (B) LP and their related feeder, blocker, parallel, alternative investment and holding entities (“Dyal Fund III”), Dyal Capital Partners IV (A) LP, Dyal Capital Partners IV (B) LP and Dyal Capital Partners IV (C) LP and their related feeder, blocker, parallel, alternative investment and holding entities (“Dyal Fund IV”) and Dyal Capital Partners V (A) LP and Dyal Capital Partners V (B) LP and their related feeder, blocker, parallel, alternative investment and holding entities (“Dyal Fund V”), collectively.
 
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Dyal Equityholders
” refers to Neuberger, the Dyal Principals and any other holders of Dyal Capital equity interests.
 
   
Dyal Financing Fund
” refers to the existing fund and its related feeder, parallel, alternative investment and holding entities within the GP Debt Financing Investments strategy.
 
   
Dyal HomeCourt Fund
” refers to the existing fund and its related feeder, parallel, alternative investment and holding entities that seeks to acquire minority equity investments in NBA Teams that forms part of the Professional Sports Minority Investments strategy.
 
   
Dyal Principals
” refers to Michael Rees, Sean Ward and Andrew Laurino.
 
   
Electing Owl Rock Equityholders
” refers to the Owl Rock Equityholders who elect to receive Common Units in connection with the Business Combination in lieu of common stock of Blue Owl.
 
   
fee paying AUM
” or “
FPAUM
” refers to the AUM on which management fees are earned. For our BDCs, FPAUM is generally equal to total assets (including assets acquired with debt but excluding cash). For our other Direct Lending products, FPAUM is generally equal to NAV or investment cost. FPAUM also includes uncalled committed capital for products where we earn management fees on such uncalled committed capital. For our GP Capital Solutions products, FPAUM for the GP minority equity investments strategy is generally equal to capital commitments during the investment period and the cost of unrealized investments after the investment period. For GP Capital Solutions’ other strategies, FPAUM is generally equal to investment cost. For Real Estate, FPAUM is generally based on total assets (including assets acquired with debt).
 
   
fee related earnings
” or “FRE”, a
non-GAAP
measure, is used to assess our operating performance by determining whether recurring revenue, primarily consisting of management fees, is sufficient to cover operating expenses and to generate profits. FRE is derived from and reconciled to, but not equivalent to its most directly comparable GAAP measure of net income (loss) before income taxes. FRE differs from income before taxes computed in accordance with GAAP as it adjusts for transaction-related charges, equity-based compensation,
non-controlling
interests in subsidiaries of the Company and certain other items that we believe reflects our operating performance. Other than for Owl Rock, the calculation of FRE also adjusts for performance income, performance related compensation and investment net gains (losses). Management believes that adding these adjustments assist in clarifying stable and predictable cash flows that cover operating expenses and lead to the generation of profits.
 
   
our funds
” refers to the funds, investment vehicles, BDCs, managed accounts and other entities, accounts and investment products that are managed or
co-managed
by Blue Owl, Owl Rock or Dyal Capital.
 
   
FIC Assets
” refers to the “FIC Assets” described in Note 1 of the Notes to Consolidated and Combined Financial Statements of Owl Rock Group and subsidiaries and Owl Rock Securities.
 
   
Financial Statements
” refers to the consolidated and combined financial statements included in our Annual Report filed on Form
10-K
for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021.
 
   
FINRA
” refers to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.
 
   
GAAP
” refers to United States generally accepted accounting principles, consistently applied.
 
   
GP Capital Solutions
” refers to our GP Capital Solutions products, which primarily focus on acquiring equity stakes in, or providing debt financing to, large, multi-product private equity and private credit platforms through three existing and one emerging investment strategies: GP minority equity investments, GP debt financing, professional sports minority investments and
co-investments
and structured equity. GP Capital Solutions products are managed by the Dyal Capital division of Blue Owl.
 
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GP Debt Financing strategy
” refers to the investment strategy of certain Dyal Capital funds that primarily relates to originating and making collateralized, long-term debt investments, preferred equity investments and structured investments in private capital managers.
 
   
GP Minority Equity Investments strategy
” refers to the investment strategy of certain Dyal Capital funds that primarily relates to acquiring minority equity interests in investment management businesses or fund sponsors.
 
   
incentive fees
” refers to contractual fees or other payments based on a percentage of a fund’s net gains, profits and/or income, which formulation may take into account a preferred return threshold, in each case as described in the fund’s constituent documents (excluding, for the sake of clarity, carried interest allocations). Incentive fees may be calculated based on a combination of realized and unrealized amounts and/or current income.
 
   
Investment Company Act
” refers to the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder.
 
   
Investor Rights Agreement
” refers to the Investor Rights Agreement between Blue Owl, Altimar Sponsor, the Altimar Founders and certain of the Owl Rock Equityholders and Dyal Equityholders.
 
   
IPO
” refers to Altimar’s initial public offering of its Units, Public Shares and Public Warrants pursuant to the IPO registration statement and completed on October 27, 2020.
 
   
Key Individuals
” refers to each of Douglas Ostrover, Marc Lipschultz and Michael Rees.
 
   
long dated
” refers to the contractual life of any finite private fund or managed account of 5 years or more as of the date hereof.
 
   
management fees
” for Owl Rock refers to fees that it earns for advisory services provided to its funds, which are generally based on a defined percentage of average fair value of gross assets (excluding cash), or average fair value of gross assets (excluding cash) plus undrawn commitments, in the case of our BDCs, or fair value of gross assets (excluding cash), fair value of investments plus undrawn commitments, or invested capital in the case of Owl Rock’s private debt funds and managed accounts, and also include Part I Fees. For Dyal Capital, management fees are derived from investment management services provided to private funds and are payable quarterly or semi-annually, at the beginning or end of the service period. For the GP Minority Equity Investments strategy, the fees are generally determined based upon a percentage of capital committed during the investment period, and thereafter generally based on the cost of unrealized investments; or as otherwise defined in the respective agreements. For the other Dyal Capital strategies, the fees are generally determined based upon a percentage of investment cost or as otherwise defined in the respective agreements.
 
   
NBA
” refers to the National Basketball Association.
 
   
Neuberger
” refers to Neuberger Berman Group LLC, a Delaware limited liability company.
 
   
NYSE
” refers to the New York Stock Exchange.
 
   
Oak Street
” refers to the investment advisory business of Oak Street Real Estate Capital, LLC that was acquired on December 29, 2021, and is now a division of Blue Owl.
 
   
Oak Street Acquisition
” refers to the acquisition of Oak Street completed on December 29, 2021.
 
   
our BDCs
” refers to our business development companies, as regulated under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended: Owl Rock Capital Corporation (NYSE: ORCC) (“ORCC”), Owl Rock Capital Corporation II (“ORCC II”), Owl Rock Capital Corporation III (“ORCC III”), Owl Rock Technology Finance Corp. (“ORTF”), Owl Rock Technology Finance Corp. II (“ORTF II”), Owl Rock Core Income Corp. (“ORCIC”) and Owl Rock Technology Income Corp. (“ORTIC”).
 
   
Owl Rock
” refers collectively to the combined businesses of Owl Rock Capital Group LLC (“Owl Rock Capital Group”) and Blue Owl Securities LLC (formerly, Owl Rock Capital Securities LLC),
 
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which was the predecessor of Blue Owl for accounting and financial reporting purposes. References to the Owl Rock division refer to Owl Rock Capital Group and its subsidiaries that manage our Direct Lending products.
 
   
Owl Rock Capital
” refers to a
carve-out
of Owl Rock Group and its consolidated operating subsidiaries (which
carve-out
excludes such operating subsidiaries constituting FIC assets) after giving effect to a
pre-Closing
reorganization.
 
   
Owl Rock Capital Partners
” refers to Owl Rock Capital Partners LP, a Delaware limited partnership and indirect equityholder in, and managing member of, Owl Rock.
 
   
Owl Rock Equityholders
” refers to the Owl Rock Principals, Owl Rock Feeder and certain other direct and indirect third party holders of equity interests in Owl Rock Capital.
 
   
Owl Rock Feeder
” refers to Owl Rock Capital Feeder LLC, a Delaware limited liability company.
 
   
Owl Rock Group
” refers to Owl Rock Capital Group LLC, a Delaware limited liability company.
 
   
Owl Rock Principals
” refers to Douglas I. Ostrover, Marc S. Lipschultz, Craig W. Packer and Alan J. Kirshenbaum.
 
   
Owl Rock Securities
” refers to Owl Rock Capital Securities LLC, a Delaware limited liability company. Owl Rock Securities is a broker-dealer registered with the SEC, a member of FINRA and the Securities Investor Protection Corporation. Owl Rock Securities is owned by Owl Rock Capital Partners and provides distribution services to Owl Rock. In May 2021, Owl Rock Capital Securities LLC changed its name to Blue Owl Securities LLC.
 
   
Part I Fees
” refers to quarterly performance income on the net investment income of our BDCs and similarly structured products, subject to a fixed hurdle rate. These fees are classified as management fees throughout this prospectus, as they are predictable and recurring in nature, not subject to repayment, and cash-settled each quarter.
 
   
Part II Fees
” generally refers to fees from our BDCs and similarly structured products that are paid in arrears as of the end of each measurement period when the cumulative aggregate realized capital gains exceed the cumulative aggregate realized capital losses and aggregate unrealized capital depreciation, less the aggregate amount of Part II Fees paid in all prior years since inception. Part II Fees are classified as realized performance income throughout this prospectus.
 
   
partner manager
” refers to an investment management business or fund sponsor in which the GP Minority Equity Investments strategy funds invests.
 
   
performance income
” refers to income earned or allocated based on the performance of a fund as defined in the product’s investment management or partnership agreements and may be either incentive fees or carried interest and/or incentive allocations. Notwithstanding the foregoing, Part I Fees are generally treated as management fees due to their recurring nature.
 
   
permanent capital
” refers to capital of our products that do not have ordinary redemption provisions or a requirement to exit investments after a prescribed period of time and to return to investors the proceeds representing the capital invested in such investments, except as required by applicable law or pursuant to redemption requests that can only be made after significant
lock-up
periods. Such products may be required, or elect, to return all or a portion of capital gains and investment income. Permanent capital may be subject to management fee step downs or roll-offs over time.
 
   
PIPE Investment
” means the private placement pursuant to which PIPE Investors made a private investment in the aggregate amount of $1,500,000,000 in public equity in the form of Class A Shares on the terms and conditions set forth in the Subscription Agreements.
 
   
PIPE Investors
” refers to the investors that have signed Subscription Agreements.
 
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PIPE Securities
” refers to the Class A Shares sold to the PIPE Investors pursuant to the Subscription Agreements.
 
   
portfolio companies
” and “
portfolio investments
” refer to partner managers with which Dyal Capital invests, borrowers of Owl Rock loans, and investments of both platforms and, in certain cases, investment thereby, in each case unless the context indicates otherwise.
 
   
Principals
” refers to our founders and senior members of management who hold, or in the future may hold, Class B Shares and Class D Shares. Class B Shares and Class D Shares collectively represent 80% of the total voting power of all shares.
 
   
Private Placement Warrants
” refers to the warrants acquired by Altimar Sponsor for an aggregate purchase price of $7,000,000 in a private placement simultaneously with the closing of the IPO, which were subsequently converted into warrants to purchase shares of Blue Owl Class A Shares in connection with the Business Combination).
 
   
Public Warrants
” refers to the warrants issued in the IPO, entitling the holder thereof to purchase one of Altimar’s Class A ordinary shares at an exercise price of $11.50, subject to adjustment, which were subsequently converted into warrants to purchase shares of Blue Owl Class A Shares in connection with the Business Combination.
 
   
Real Estate
” refers, unless context indicates otherwise, to our Real Estate products, which primarily focus on providing investors with predictable current income, and potential for appreciation, while focusing on limiting downside risk through a unique net lease platform. Real Estate products are managed by the Oak Street division of Blue Owl.
 
   
reimbursed expenses
” refer to expenses reimbursed by Dyal Capital’s private funds, such as travel, and also expenses incurred by Dyal Capital’s Business Services Platform in connection with the provision of strategic support services to partner managers.
 
   
“SEC”
refers to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.
 
   
Securities Act
” refers to the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.
 
   
Seller Earnout Securities
” refers to the Seller Earnout Shares and the Seller Earnout Units, collectively and as applicable. For the avoidance of doubt, a “Seller Earnout Security” shall refer to either (i) one Seller Earnout Share, in the case of Owl Rock Equityholders who are not Electing Owl Rock Equityholders, or (ii) one Seller Earnout Unit, in the case of Dyal Equityholders and Electing Owl Rock Equityholders, as applicable.
 
   
Seller Earnout Shares
” refers to the Series
E-1
common stock and Series
E-2
common stock that were issued to the Owl Rock Equityholders that are not Electing Owl Rock Equityholders in connection with the Business Combination. For the avoidance of doubt, a “Seller Earnout Share” shall refer to either (i) one share of Series
E-1
common stock or (ii) one share of Series
E-2
common stock, as applicable. The Series
E-1
Class E Shares had a Class E Triggering Event on July 21, 2021, which occurred when the volume weighted-average price of a Class A Share exceeded $12.50 for 20 consecutive trading days, at which time 7,495,432 Class E Shares were converted into an equal number of Class A Shares. The Series
E-2
Class E Shares had a Class E Triggering Event on November 3, 2021, which occurred when the volume weighted-average price of a Class A Share exceeded $15.00 for 20 consecutive trading days, at which time 7,495,432 Class E Shares were converted into an equal number of Class A Shares.
 
   
Seller Earnout Units
” refers to the Series
E-1
Units and Series
E-2
Units of each of Blue Owl Holdings and Blue Owl Carry that were issued to the Dyal Equityholders and the Electing Owl Rock Equityholders in connection with the Business Combination in lieu of Seller Earnout Shares. The Series
E-1
Class E Shares had a Class E Triggering Event on July 21, 2021, which occurred when the volume weighted-average price of a Class A Share exceeded $12.50 for 20 consecutive trading days, at which time 7,495,432 Class E Shares were converted into an equal number of Class A Shares. The
 
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Series
E-2
Class E Shares had a Class E Triggering Event on November 3, 2021, which occurred when the volume weighted-average price of a Class A Share exceeded $15.00 for 20 consecutive trading days, at which time 7,495,432 Class E Shares were converted into an equal number of Class A Shares.
 
   
Specified Interests
”, with respect to management fees and similar fees, refers to the rights to share in amounts that were granted (a) as a rebate or incentive to a third party investor making a capital commitment in one or more funds, including a seed or foundation investor, (b) to certain new hires or reassigned employees who are primarily dedicated to a new business line not previously engaged in by Blue Owl or its subsidiaries, or (c) to a third party in connection with a bona fide arms’ length joint venture or bona fide arms’ length arrangement with a third party service provider.
 
   
Subscription Agreements
” refers to the subscription agreements, dated as of December 23, 2020, by and among Altimar, Neuberger, Owl Rock and the PIPE Investors, pursuant to which Altimar issued an aggregate of 150,000,000 Class A Shares to the PIPE Investors immediately before the Closing at a purchase price of $10.00 per share, as the same may be amended, modified, supplemented or waived from time to time in accordance with its terms.
 
   
“Tax Receivable Agreement
” or “
TRA
” refers to the Amended and Restated Tax Receivable Agreement, dated as of October 22, 2021, as may be amended from time to time by and among the Registrant, Blue Owl Capital GP LLC, the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships and each of the Partners (as defined therein) party thereto.
 
   
transfer agent
” refers to Computershare Trust Company, N.A. and Computershare Inc.
 
   
UBT
” refers to Unincorporated Business Tax.
 
   
Warrant Agent
” refers to Computershare Trust Company, N.A. and Computershare Inc.
 
   
Warrants
” refers to the Public Warrants and the Private Placement Warrants.
 
   
Wellfleet
” refers to the performing credit business of Wellfleet Credit Partners, LLC that was acquired on April 1, 2022 and is now a part of Blue Owl.
 
   
Wellfleet Acquisition
” refers to the acquisition of Wellfleet completed on April 1, 2022.
 
   
Working Capital
” of Owl Rock Capital or the Dyal Capital Business refers to the sum of (a) the cash and current receivables held or accrued as of the time of determination minus (b) the sum of the (i) operating expenses reasonably expected to arise immediately after the time of determination, consistent with past practice, and (ii) anticipated bonuses and other expenses in respect of the periods ending on or prior to the Closing, consistent with past practice.
Many of the terms used in this prospectus, including Adjusted Compensation, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Revenues, AUM, DE, FPAUM and FRE, may not be comparable to similarly titled measures used by other companies. In addition, our definitions of AUM and FPAUM are not based on any definition of AUM or FPAUM that is set forth in the agreements governing the investment products that Owl Rock and Dyal Capital manage and may differ from definitions of AUM or FPAUM set forth in other agreements to which Owl Rock or Dyal Capital is a party or definitions used by the SEC or other regulatory bodies. Further, Adjusted Compensation, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Revenues, DE and FRE are not measures of performance calculated in accordance with GAAP. We use Adjusted Compensation, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Revenues, DE and FRE as measures of operating performance, not as measures of liquidity. They should not be considered in isolation or as substitutes for operating income, net income, operating cash flows, or other income or cash flow statement data prepared in accordance with GAAP. The use of these measures without consideration of related GAAP measures is not adequate due to the adjustments described above. Our management compensates for these limitations by using FRE as supplemental measures to our GAAP results. We present this measure to provide a more complete understanding of our performance as our management measures it. Amounts and percentages throughout this prospectus may reflect rounding adjustments and consequently totals may not appear to sum. For reconciliations of
non-GAAP
measures used by Blue Owl to Blue Owl’s GAAP results, see “
Blue Owl’s
 
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Management’s Discussion and Analysis of
Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Reconciliation of Consolidated GAAP Financial Measures to Certain
Non-GAAP
Measures
” in this prospectus.
We disclose certain financial measures in this prospectus that are calculated and presented using methodologies other than in accordance with GAAP. We believe that providing these performance measures on a supplemental basis to our GAAP results is helpful to stockholders in assessing the overall performance of Blue Owl’s businesses. These financial measures should not be considered as a substitute for similar financial measures calculated in accordance with GAAP, if available. We caution readers that these
non-GAAP
financial measures may differ from the calculations of other investment managers, and as a result, may not be comparable to similar measures presented by other investment managers.
 
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CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This prospectus contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), which reflect our current views with respect to, among other things, future events, operations and financial performance. You can identify these forward-looking statements by the use of forward-looking words such as “outlook,” “believes,” “expects,” “potential,” “continues,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “seeks,” “approximately,” “predicts,” “projects,” “intends,” “plans,” “estimates,” “anticipates” or the negative version of those words, other comparable words or other statements that do not relate to historical or factual matters. The forward-looking statements are based on our beliefs, assumptions and expectations of our future performance, taking into account all information currently available to us. Such forward-looking statements are subject to various risks, uncertainties (some of which are beyond our control) or other assumptions relating to our operations, financial results, financial condition, business prospects, growth strategy and liquidity that may cause actual results or performance to be materially different from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Some of these factors are described under the sections entitled “
Risk Factors
” and “
Blue Owl
s Management
s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
.” These factors should not be construed as exhaustive and should be read in conjunction with the risk factors and other cautionary statements that are included in this prospectus and in our other periodic filings. If one or more of these or other risks or uncertainties materialize, or if our underlying assumptions prove to be incorrect, our actual results may vary materially from those indicated in these forward-looking statements. New risks and uncertainties arise over time, and it is not possible for us to predict those events or how they may affect us. Therefore, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which it is made. We do not undertake any obligation to publicly update or review any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise, except as required by law.
 
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SUMMARY
This summary highlights selected information contained elsewhere in this prospectus and does not contain all of the information you should consider when making your investment decision. We urge you to read this prospectus in its entirety, including the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes, carefully to gain a fuller understanding of our business and the terms of the notes, as well as some of the other considerations that may be important to you, before making your investment decision. You should pay special attention to the “Risk Factors” sections of this prospectus to determine whether an investment in the notes is appropriate for you.
Our Company
Blue Owl is a global alternative asset manager with $94.5 billion in AUM as of December 31, 2021. Anchored by a strong permanent capital base, the firm deploys private capital across Direct Lending, GP Capital Solutions and Real Estate strategies on behalf of institutional and private wealth clients. Blue Owl’s flexible, consultative approach helps position the firm as a partner of choice for businesses seeking capital solutions to support their sustained growth. The firm’s management team is comprised of seasoned investment professionals with more than 25 years of experience building alternative investment businesses. Blue Owl employs over 350 people across 9 offices globally.
Blue Owl was formed through the combination of Owl Rock and Dyal Capital in May 2021, at which time these businesses merged with and into Altimar Acquisition Corporation (“Altimar”), a blank check, special purpose acquisition company. The combination of Owl Rock and Dyal Capital creates a platform primed to continue servicing these markets. In December 2021, we acquired Oak Street, which expanded our firm’s offerings to include real estate-focused products.
Our breadth of offerings and permanent capital base enable us to offer a differentiated, holistic platform of capital solutions to middle market companies, large alternative asset managers and corporate real estate owners and tenants. We provide these solutions through our permanent capital vehicles, as well as long-dated private funds, that we believe provide our business with a high degree of earnings stability and predictability. Our permanent capital vehicles are products that do not have ordinary redemption provisions or a requirement to exit investments after a prescribed period of time to return invested capital to investors, except as required by applicable law or pursuant to redemption requests that can only be made after significant
lock-up
periods. For the quarter ended December 31, 2021, approximately 98% of our management fees were earned from permanent capital vehicles.
Our global, high-caliber, investor base includes a diversified mix of institutional investors, including prominent public and private pension funds, endowments, foundations, family offices, private banks, high net worth individuals, asset managers and insurance companies, as well as retail clients, accessed through many well-known wealth management firms. We have continued to grow our investor base and presence in the growing private markets and alternative asset management sector by emphasizing our disciplined investment approach, client service, and portfolio performance.
While we currently offer Direct Lending, GP Capital Solutions and Real Estate products across three divisions (Owl Rock, Dyal Capital and Oak Street), our management takes a
one-firm
approach when making operating decisions and determining how to allocate resources. As a result, we currently operate as a single reportable segment. Management regularly reviews our revenues by product line and our expenses by type at the total firm level (e.g., compensation and benefits; general, administrative and other expenses), and therefore we have presented details of our operating results throughout this prospectus consistent with how management reviews our results.
 
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Our revenues are generated primarily from the investment advisory and administrative services agreements we have with our products. See Note 2 to our Financial Statements for a detailed description of how we earn our revenues and the significant impact that our FPAUM has on the amount of revenues we earn each period. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”) presents additional information on our revenues and operating results, as well as historical AUM and performance information for certain of our products; such information should be read in conjunction with this description of our business.
Our Products
We have three major product lines: Direct Lending, GP Capital Solutions and Real Estate. We believe our products, while distinct, are complementary to each other and together enable us to provide a differentiated platform of varied capital solutions. All of our products employ a disciplined investment philosophy with a focus on long-term investment horizons and are managed by tenured leadership and investment professionals with significant experience in their respective strategies.
Our products are generally structured as BDCs, REITs and private investments funds that aggregate capital from investors. As the investment manager of our products, we invest that capital with the goal of generating attractive, risk-based returns for the investors in our products. In many of our products, we may use leverage to increase the size of the investments our products are able to make. As further explained in Note 2 to our Financial Statements, we generally earn management fees on the amount of FPAUM that we manage; therefore, the growth and success of our product offerings is paramount to our success as an alternative asset manager.
Our products create a robust foundation for our holistic platform. We believe the success and growth in our businesses since inception has been driven by a singular, dedicated focus on providing capital solutions and the differentiating competitive features of our platform.
 
Blue Owl
AUM: $94.5 billion
FPAUM: $61.4 billion
 
Direct Lending Products
AUM: $39.2 billion
FPAUM: $32.0 billion
  
 
GP Capital Solutions Products
AUM: $39.9 billion
FPAUM: $21.2 billion
  
 
Real Estate Products
AUM: $15.4 billion
FPAUM: $8.2 billion
 
Diversified Lending
Commenced 2016
AUM: $25.8 billion
FPAUM: $21.6 billion
  
 
GP Minority Equity
Commenced 2010
AUM: $38.7 billion
FPAUM: $20.4 billion
  
 
Net Lease
Commenced 2009
AUM: $15.4 billion
FPAUM: $8.2 billion
 
Technology Lending
Commenced 2018
AUM: $7.9 billion
FPAUM: $6.9 billion
  
 
GP Debt Financing
Commenced 2019
AUM: $1.0 billion
FPAUM: $0.7 billion
  
 
First Lien Lending
Commenced 2018
AUM: $3.5 billion
FPAUM: $2.3 billion
  
 
Professional Sports Minority Investments
Commenced 2021
AUM: $0.2 billion
FPAUM: $0.2 billion
  
 
Opportunistic Lending
Commenced 2020
AUM: $2.0 billion
FPAUM: $1.2 billion
     
 
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Direct Lending
Our Direct Lending products offer private credit products to middle-market companies seeking capital solutions. We believe our breadth of offerings establishes us as the lending partner of choice for private-equity sponsored companies, as well as other predominately
non-cyclical,
recession-resistant businesses. Since the launch of our flagship institutional product, ORCC, we have continued to prudently expand our offerings, focusing on adjacent strategies that are both additive and complementary to our existing product base. Our Direct Lending products are offered through a mix of BDCs, long-dated private funds and other vehicles across the following investment strategies:
 
   
Diversified Lending:
Our Diversified Lending strategy seeks to generate current income and, to a lesser extent, capital appreciation by targeting investment opportunities with favorable risk-adjusted returns across credit cycles with an emphasis on preserving capital primarily through originating and making loans to, and making debt and equity investments in, U.S. middle market companies. We provide a wide range of financing solutions with strong focus on the top of the capital structure and operate this strategy through diversification by borrower, sector, sponsor, and position size. Our Diversified Lending strategy is primarily offered to investors through our BDCs.
 
   
Technology Lending:
Our Technology Lending strategy seeks to maximize total return by generating current income from our debt investments and other income producing securities, and capital appreciation from our equity and equity-linked investments primarily through originating and making loans to, and making debt and equity investments in, technology related companies based primarily in the United States. We originate and invest in senior secured or unsecured loans, subordinated loans or mezzanine loans, and equity and equity-related securities including common equity, warrants, preferred stock and similar forms of senior equity, which may be convertible into a portfolio company’s common equity. Our Technology Lending strategy invests in a broad range of established and high growth technology companies that are capitalizing on the large and growing demand for technology products and services. This strategy focuses on companies that operate in technology-related industries or sectors which include, but are not limited to, information technology, application or infrastructure software, financial services, data and analytics, security, cloud computing, communications, life sciences, healthcare, media, consumer electronics, semi-conductor, internet commerce and advertising, environmental, aerospace and defense industries and sectors. Our Technology Lending strategy is primarily offered to investors through our technology-focused BDCs.
 
   
First Lien Lending:
Our First Lien Lending strategy seeks to realize current income with an emphasis on preservation of capital primarily through originating primary transactions in and, to a lesser extent, secondary transactions of first lien senior secured loans in or related to private-equity sponsored, middle market businesses based primarily in the United States. Our First Lien strategy is offered to investors through our long-dated private funds and managed accounts.
 
   
Opportunistic Lending:
Our Opportunistic Lending strategy seeks to generate attractive risk-adjusted returns by taking advantage of credit opportunities in U.S. middle market companies with liquidity needs and market leaders seeking to improve their balance sheets. We focus on high-quality companies that could be experiencing disruption, dislocation, distress or transformational change. We aim to be the partner of choice for companies by being well-equipped to provide a variety of financing solutions to meet a broad range of situations, including the following: (i) rescue financing, (ii) new issuance and recapitalizations, (iii) wedge capital,
(iv) debtor-in-possession
loans, (v) financing for additional liquidity and covenant relief and (vi) broken syndications. Our Opportunistic Lending strategy is offered to investors through our long-dated private funds and managed accounts.
 
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GP Capital Solutions
Our GP Capital Solutions products position us as a leading capital solutions provider to large private capital managers. We primarily focus on acquiring equity stakes in, or providing debt financing to large, multi-product private equity and private credit firms, which we may refer to as “GPs.” Our GP Capital Solutions division also houses our Business Services Platform, which provides strategic support to our Partner Managers. Our GP Capital Solutions products are offered primarily through permanent capital vehicles across the following investment strategies:
 
   
GP Minority Equity Investments:
We build diversified portfolios of minority equity investments in institutionalized alternative asset management firms across multiple strategies, geographies, and asset classes. Our investment objective is to generate compelling cash yield by collecting a set percentage of contractually fixed management fees, a set percentage of carried interest and return on balance sheet investments made by underlying managers. We primarily focus on acquiring minority positions in large, multi-product alternative asset managers who continue to gain a disproportionate proportion of the assets flowing into private investment strategies and exhibit high levels of stability. Our inaugural funds followed a hedge fund manager-focused investment program that has since evolved into a private capital manager-focused investment program in our more recent funds. Our GP Minority Equity Investments strategy is offered to investors through our
closed-end,
permanent capital funds. A fundamental component of the fundraising efforts for our investment programs is the ability to identify and execute
co-investment
opportunities for our investors. We may offer, from
time-to-time
and in our sole discretion,
co-investment
opportunities in certain fund investments, generally with no management or incentive-based fee.
 
   
GP Debt Financing:
The GP Debt Financing strategy focuses on originating and making collateralized, long-term debt investments, preferred equity investments and structured investments in private capital managers. We originate and invest in secured term loans that are collateralized by substantially all of the assets of a manager and subject to repayment on an accelerated basis pursuant to cash flow sweeps of set percentages of management fees, GP realization, carried interest and other fee streams of the management company in the event that certain minimum coverage ratios are not maintained. Our investment objective is to generate current income by targeting investment opportunities with attractive risk-adjusted returns. We expect that the loans will be made to allow borrowers to support business growth, fund GP commitments, and launch new strategies. The GP Debt Financing strategy allows us to offer a comprehensive suite of solutions to private capital managers.
 
   
Professional Sports Minority Investments:
Our Professional Sports Minority Investments strategy focuses on building diversified portfolios of minority equity investments in professional sport teams. Our first fund in this strategy is
NBA-focused.
Real Estate
Our real estate products primarily focus on structuring sale-leaseback transactions, which includes triple net leases.
 
   
Net Lease:
Our Net Lease real estate strategy is focused on acquiring properties
net-leased,
long-term to investment grade and creditworthy tenants. Oak Street’s Net Lease real estate strategies focus on acquiring single tenant properties, across industrial, essential retail and mission critical office sectors. By combining our proprietary origination platform, enhanced lease structures and a disciplined investment criteria, we seek to provide investors with predictable current income, and potential for appreciation, while focusing on limiting downside risk.
 
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Our History
Blue Owl’s history is predicated on the key milestones of both Owl Rock and Dyal Capital. Owl Rock was founded in 2016 by Doug Ostrover, Marc Lipschultz and Craig Packer to address the evolving need for direct lending solutions by middle-market companies. Dyal Capital was founded in 2010 by Michael Rees to fill the need for flexible capital solutions for private capital managers. In December 2021, we acquired the Oak Street business, which allowed us to further diversify the products we offer our investors. Since its founding in 2009 by Marc Zahr, Oak Street has established itself as a leader in private equity real estate, offering flexible and unique capital solutions to a variety of corporations and other organizations.
The combination of these businesses creates a platform primed to continue servicing these markets. Blue Owl’s robust and diversified platform offerings will continue to serve as a response to the following sector dynamics:
 
   
shifting allocations by retail institutional investors.
 
   
rotation onto alternatives given the search for yield and reliability of returns.
 
   
rising need for private debt driven by sponsor demand.
 
   
evolving landscape of the private debt market.
 
   
de-leveraging
of the global banking system.
 
   
increasing need for flexible capital solutions by private capital managers.
Across our businesses, our presence in the market combined with our constant dialogue with financial sponsors, companies and our investors, has allowed us to identify attractive opportunities in adjacent subsectors over time.
Since inception, Owl Rock, Dyal Capital and Oak Street have launched multiple new strategies and products, exclusively in areas where we believed we could leverage our competitive advantage and expertise, and where we believe we had identified critical mass of lending, capital and real estate solutions opportunities as well as heightened investor interest. We have focused on executing on key adjacencies that are natural extensions of existing core strategies in order to capitalize on the growing dislocations in the market and rising investor demand.
Our Competitive Strengths
 
   
High proportion of permanent capital.
We have a high-quality capital base heavily weighted toward permanent capital. For the quarter ended December 31, 2021, approximately 98% of our management fees were earned on AUM that we refer to as permanent capital. Our BDCs, by nature, are
closed-end,
permanent (or potentially permanent) funds with no mandatory redemption and potentially unlimited duration once listed. Substantially all of the AUM in our GP Capital Solutions and Real Estate products are also structured as permanent capital vehicles. The high proportion of permanent capital in our AUM provides a stable base and allows for our AUM to grow more predictably without having reductions in our asset levels due to ordinary redemptions. Our permanent capital base also lends stability and flexibility to our portfolio companies and Partner Managers, providing us the opportunity to grow alongside these companies and positioning us to be a preferred source of capital and the incumbent lender for
follow-ons
and other capital solutions to high-performing companies. As such, we are able to be a compelling partner for these firms as they seek capital to support their long-term vision and business development goals. The stability of our AUM base enables us to focus on generating attractive returns by investing in assets with a long-term focus across different periods in the market cycle.
 
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Significant embedded growth in current AUM with
built-in
mechanisms for fee revenue increases.
While we expect to continue our successful fundraising track record to supplement our existing capital base, our current AUM, predominately permanent capital in nature, already provides for significant embedded growth. Of our $94.5 billion AUM base, $61.4 billion represents our current FPAUM. As of December 31, 2021, we have approximately $11.0 billion in AUM not yet paying fees, providing approximately $140.0 million of annualized management fees once deployed. In addition, to the extent any of our BDCs become publicly listed, under the advisory agreements the advisory fees from the applicable BDC could potentially increase, subject to any fee waivers or deferral arrangements agreed to by us and the applicable BDC.
 
   
Stable earnings model with attractive margin profile.
The majority of our revenues is generated from our stable management fees. Our predictable revenue base translates to a stable earnings model through a disciplined, efficient cost structure, producing strong profit margins and mitigating the risk of volatility in the profit margins. This allows our business model to maintain a disciplined cost structure and stable operating margins.
 
   
Extensive, long-term relationships with a robust and vast network of alternative asset managers.
We have extensive alternative asset manager relationships, which allow us to quickly and efficiently source potential investment opportunities for our products. We believe our deep relationships position us to receive “early looks” and “last looks” from alternative asset managers, which in turn, allow us to be highly selective in deciding which investments to pursue. We believe the depth and breadth of our relationships are predicated on several, differentiating features of our platform and that alternative asset managers value our team’s experience and deep focus both within products and across a broad spectrum of capital solutions. Our expansive set of product offerings allows us to provide flexible and creative solutions, and in tandem with our sizeable permanent capital base, enables us to provide access to scaled, sizeable commitments. Partner Managers in our GP Capital Solutions products also value our Business Services Platform, which provides strategic value-added services to our Partner Managers in five key areas: client development and marketing support, business strategy, product development, talent management, and operational advice. We expect our differentiated approach and broad spectrum of capital solution products will continue to strengthen our relationships, and we intend to further expand our network to fortify our position as a preferred partner for alternative asset managers and their portfolio companies.
 
   
Increasing benefits of scale.
We believe our robust, scaled platform presents us with a competitive advantage which enables us to provide attractive solutions as a trusted partner and therefore continue to capture market share. Many institutional investors are concentrating their relationships in an effort to partner with dependable, scaled firms with proven track records that they have a high level of comfort with. Our scaled platform enables us to remain a partner of choice not only for borrowers, GPs and tenants, but also for investors. We believe we will not only maintain, but continue to expand our share of the market as a result of the high level of confidence investors have in our scaled capital solutions platform. Our ability to provide diversification and niche access points will continue to attract investor interest as they seek diversification and continue to value lower-correlation portfolio allocations.
Within Direct Lending, there is significant competition for loans below $50 million, but there are much fewer lenders capable of providing solutions over $100 million. Our differentiated approach and scaled direct lending platform allow us to capitalize on opportunities across the sizing spectrum—from loans below $50 million to loans over $1.0 billion. Our platform’s scale has demonstrated the ability to originate larger deals, while also providing diversification in our portfolios. We believe our scale enables us to broaden our deal funnel and provides us access to more investment opportunities than many other direct lenders. We have significant available capital that allows us to provide scaled financing solutions, commit to full capital structures and support capital needs of borrowers. We believe being a total solutions provider also grants us a broader view of market opportunities, which allows us to continue operating as a market leader.
 
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Within GP Capital Solutions, we have also established ourselves as a market leader, with a long track record, greatest amount of aggregate capital raised and largest number of publicly-announced deals. The target size of our current fund being raised, Fund V, is materially larger than the approximately $5 billion fund sizes of our main competitors. Our large base of stable capital not only enables participation in investments across the sizing spectrum, but also creates a competitive advantage by positioning us as a highly qualified buyer for minority stakes in large, established GPs. We believe that we also gain access to proprietary deal flow as a result of the market’s confidence in our ability to execute on large investments expeditiously. We believe our strong reputation in the market combined with our scale will continue to provide us with unique access to the most attractive sectors of the alternative asset management universe.
Within Real Estate, we have a targeted origination strategy that benefits from Oak Street’s strong network and allows us to be competitive with other net lease peers. Oak Street proactively builds and maintains strong relationships with large investment grade-rated and creditworthy companies whose businesses offer essential goods or services and which we believe are generally resistant to
e-commerce
and economic downside risks, and structures mutually beneficial transactions with long lease durations, and in many cases, favorable pricing. We intend to leverage Oak Street’s corporate partnerships to both source unique investment opportunities unavailable to other market participants and negotiate attractive lease terms. We believe our strong origination capabilities, conservative underwriting criteria and strong existing tenant relationships will allow our Real Estate products to purchase properties in the future at attractive terms and pricing, providing significant long-term opportunities for growth and scale.
 
   
Diverse, global and growing high-quality investor base.
Our global investor base is composed of long-standing institutional relationships, as well as a quickly growing retail investor base. Our institutional clients include large domestic and international public and private pension funds, endowments, foundations, family offices, sovereign wealth funds, asset managers and insurance companies. Our retail clients include prominent wealth management firms, private banks, and
high-net
worth investors. As we continue to grow, we expect to retain our existing clients through our breadth of offerings. As of December 31, 2021, approximately 36% of our institutional investors are invested in more than one product, with many increasing their commitment to their initial strategy and additionally committing additional capital across our other strategies. We believe our diligent management of investors’ capital, combined with our strong performance and increasingly diversified product offerings has helped retain and attract investors which has furthered our growth in FPAUM and facilitated further expansion of our strategies. We also believe the global nature of our investor base enables significant cross-selling opportunities between our products and strategies. We are committed to providing our clients with a superior level of service. We believe our client-focused nature, rooted in our culture of transparency will help us continue to retain and attract high quality investors to our platform.
 
   
Industry-leading management team with proven track record.
We are led by a team of seasoned executives with significant and diverse experience at the world’s leading financial institutions. Our
best-in-class
management team has considerable expertise across their respective product strategies, with a long track record of successful investing experience across multiple businesses and credit cycles. Members of our senior management have an average of over 25 years of experience and a strong track record in building successful businesses from the ground up and generating superior returns across market cycles. Additionally, our senior management team has experienced no turnover since the inception of our predecessor businesses which we believe has enabled us to build meaningful long-term relationships and partnerships with alternative asset managers as well as with our investors.
 
   
Alignment of interests with stakeholders.
We consider the alignment of interests of our executive management team and other professionals with those of the investors in our products to be core to our business. AUM (inclusive of accrued carried interest) related to our executives and other employees
 
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totaled approximately $1.9 billion, which aligns their interests with our clients’ interests by motivating the continued high-performance and retention of our dedicated team of professionals.
Our Growth Strategy
We aim to continue applying our core principles and values that have guided us since inception in order to expand our business through the following strategies:
 
   
Organically grow our core business.
We expect to continue to grow AUM in our existing strategies, and intend to launch additional, successor permanent capital vehicles and similar long-dated products in the future. We will benefit from significant embedded growth in our current AUM that is not yet paying fees that can be realized as we continue to deploy and lever our existing capital base and as fee holidays in certain funds expire. We believe these key attributes, in conjunction with our ability to raise successor products in existing strategies, will continue to play a key role in our growth profile. We also expect to enhance our AUM growth by expanding our current investor relationships and also continuing to attract new investors.
 
   
Expand our product offering.
We plan to grow our platform by expanding our product offerings. We intend to take a diligent and deliberate approach to expansion, by adding products that are complementary, adjacent or additive to our current strategies. To date, our measured approach to growth through the addition of adjacent strategies has allowed us to continue delivering high performance to our dedicated investor base. We expect that as we continue to grow our existing strategies, there will be additional adjacencies that provide natural expansion opportunities. We believe through the disciplined expansion of our platform, we can continue to develop our breadth of offerings and further our position as a leading solutions provider. As we grow, we expect to attract new investors as well as leverage our existing investor base, as we have done with previous product launches.
 
   
Leverage complementary global distribution networks.
We are well positioned to continue to penetrate the growing global market. The success of our Direct Lending and Real Estate products to date has been primarily focused within the United States, while our GP Capital Solutions products have a more global investor base. We intend to continue fundraising both domestically and internationally. The favorable industry tailwinds are global in nature and we believe that there is additional market opportunity across the global landscape. As of December 31, 2021, 77% of capital raised was done so in the United States and Canada. We believe our strong network and track record of global fundraising has primed us to further extend our fundraising efforts across products and into additional international markets, as institutional investors across the globe are facing the same pressures and seeking the same positive attributes of the sector that have attracted domestic investors thus far. We also believe we have a significant opportunity to leverage Dyal Capital’s global fundraising capabilities and investor relationships to cross-sell our Direct Lending and Real Estate products, as well as utilize Owl Rock’s existing domestic retail channel to cross-sell our GP Capital Solutions products while increasing our global capabilities. The global market represents a large, and relatively untapped opportunity for many of our products that we believe will facilitate our pursuit of international expansion in the coming years, and position us to enter into less-developed markets where we can be a significant first-mover and play a key role in defining the markets.
 
   
Enhance our distribution channels.
As investors continue to increase their alternatives allocation in the search for yield, we believe we have the opportunity to continue diversifying our client base by attracting new investors across different channels. We intend to leverage our strong growth within and across our strategies as a means to add new investors to our growing family of funds. We have already begun executing on this strategy, with a notable influx of wealth management platforms and public and private pension fund investors in recent years. These additions helped further diversify our investor base which also includes, but is not limited to, insurance, family offices, endowments and foundations.
 
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In addition, we have continued to grow our relationships in the consultant community. We intend to be the premier direct lending and GP minority investing platform for investors across the institutional and retail distribution channels.
 
   
Deepen and expand strong strategic relationships with key institutional investors.
We have established invaluable relationships with strategic partners, consultants and large institutional investors who provide us with key market insights, operational advice and facilitate relationship introductions. We pride ourselves on continuing to foster these relationships as they are fundamental to our business and reflect the strong alignment of interests that are highly valued by our partners. As of December 31, 2021, eight institutional investors have committed at least $1.0 billion across our strategies, 25 have committed at least $500 million, and 48 have committed at least $250 million. Our strategic partnerships allow us to craft customized solutions tailored to the objectives of our clients, while reflecting the breadth of our capabilities across our strategies. We also have important relationships with sponsors, wealth management firms, banks, corporate advisory firms, industry consultants and other market participants that we believe are of significant value. As we continue to grow, both organically and through product and geographic expansion, we will continue to pursue the addition of incremental key strategic partners.
 
   
Opportunistically pursue accretive acquisitions.
In addition to our various avenues of organic growth, we intend to diligently evaluate acquisition opportunities that we believe would be value-enhancing to our current platform. These could include acquisitions that would expand the breadth of our product offerings, further develop our investor base, or facilitate our plans for global expansion. We believe that as the market continues to evolve, there will be numerous opportunities for us to consider, of which we intend to only pursue the most accretive acquisitions.
Competition
The investment management industry is intensely competitive, and we expect it to remain so. We compete globally and on a regional, industry and asset basis. We face competition both in the pursuit of investors for our products and investment opportunities. Generally, our competition varies across product lines, geographies and financial markets. We compete for investors based on a variety of factors, including investment performance, investor perception of investment managers’ drive, focus and alignment of interest, quality of service provided to and duration of relationship with investors, breath of our product offering, business reputation and the level of fees and expenses charged for services. We compete for investment opportunities at our funds based on a variety of factors, including breadth of market coverage and relationships, access to capital, transaction execution skills, the range of products and services offered, innovation and price, and we expect that competition will continue to increase.
Competition is also intense for the attraction and retention of qualified employees. Our ability to continue to compete effectively in our businesses will depend upon our ability to attract new employees and retain and motivate our existing employees. See “
Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business and Operations
Our future growth depends on our ability to attract, retain and develop human capital in a highly competitive talent market.
Direct Lending
Our competition as an asset manager and financing source to middle market companies consists primarily of other asset managers who focus principally on credit funds, including BDCs, and other credit products. We also compete with public and private funds, BDCs, commercial and investment banks, commercial finance companies and, to the extent they provide an alternative form of financing, private equity and hedge funds. Many of our competitors are substantially larger and may have more financial, technical, and marketing resources than we do.
 
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Many of these competitors have similar investment objectives to us, which may create additional competition for investment opportunities. Some of these competitors may also have a lower cost of capital and access to funding sources that are not available to us, which may create competitive disadvantages for us with respect to investment opportunities. In addition, some of our competitors may have higher risk tolerances or different risk assessments, which could allow them to consider a wider variety of investments and establish more relationships than us. Further, many of our competitors are not subject to the regulatory restrictions that the Investment Company Act imposes on us as a business development company, or to the distribution and other requirements we must satisfy to qualify for RIC tax treatment. Lastly, institutional and individual investors are allocating increasing amounts of capital to alternative investment strategies. Several large institutional investors have announced a desire to consolidate their investments in a more limited number of managers. We expect that this will cause competition in our industry to intensify and could lead to a reduction in the size and duration of pricing inefficiencies that many of our products seek to exploit. See “
Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Our Businesses and Operations—The investment management business is intensely competitive.
GP Capital Solutions
Our GP Capital Solutions products currently have limited direct competition from organizations dedicated to acquiring stakes in large institutionalized private capital managers. More recently, a limited number of asset managers have begun acquired minority stakes in certain private capital managers. Such institutions may compete with us for similar investments in the future. We believe, however, that this limited number of competitors is likely to persist, as conflicts of interest and regulatory restrictions make purchasing minority stakes in private capital managers challenging for financial institutions and private equity firms.
With respect to our GP Debt Financing strategy, many banks provide revolving lines of credit to private equity managers, but these credit lines are typically short duration, amortize and require blanket personal guarantees. A small number of firms, provide structured or preferred equity to private capital managers, but these investments are also structurally very different from our products’ long-term loans. We believe that this limited amount of competition is likely to persist, as conflicts of interest, regulatory restrictions, capital constraints and other considerations make lending to private capital managers challenging for financial institutions, insurance companies and other private market firms.
Our current GP Capital Solutions strategies compete with among others, a number of private equity funds, specialized funds, hedge funds, corporate buyers, traditional asset managers, real estate companies, commercial banks, investment banks, other investment managers and other financial institutions, including the owners of certain of our stockholders, as well as domestic and international pension funds and sovereign wealth funds, and we expect that competition will continue to increase. See “
Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business and Operations—The investment management business is intensely competitive.
” We compete globally and on a regional, industry and asset basis.
Real Estate
Oak Street has remained the only net let lease private equity manager dedicated exclusively to transacting with investment grade rated and other creditworthy counterparties. The more stable and predictable nature of the net lease sector has brought additional competition into the space in recent years. Historically, such competition has primarily come from net lease REIT’s (publicly traded and
non-traded),
other private equity real estate funds, and high net worth buyers.
Competitors in the publicly traded net lease sector generally exhibit less stringent criteria than us with respect to pricing and lease durations, and their portfolios are comprised substantially with
non-investment
grade credits, shorter average lease terms, and meaningful near-term lease rollover. Additionally, many net lease peers
 
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focus on acquiring retail properties with an average deal size of less $10 million, whereas our Real Estate products’ transactions are typically $100 million and greater in size.
Competition from other private equity funds has grown, as many have either shifted their current real estate focus to building net lease teams or acquired existing net lease strategies. Despite this increased activity, competition with our Real Estate products on the deal level has remained relatively low, as those strategies concentrate their efforts in the
non-investment
grade space, prefer to develop properties themselves, and to deploy capital in sectors that are outside of our traditional focus of: industrial assets, mission critical office properties and essential retail. High net worth buyers have been formidable competitors and active acquirers of retail assets under $8 million; they tend to be less price sensitive and there are usually wide pools of potential buyers for these assets. As the monetization of real estate through sale-leasebacks continues to gain traction as a capital allocation tool for companies, we expect the net lease sector to grow even larger, and that will continue to attract more competition into the space.
Human Capital
As of December 31, 2021, we had approximately 350 full-time employees, including over 100 investment professionals across nine offices globally.
As an alternative asset manager, our people are the key to the success of our business. We rely significantly on our talented team, leveraging a wide variety of investment, management, business and other skills and expertise, to create value for stockholders and investors in our products. We aim to build a team that is driven and embraces an inclusive culture where our team members are engaged and work collaboratively across the organization.
Compensation and Benefits
We design our compensation programs to motivate and retain employees and align their interests with those of our stockholders. In particular, annual bonuses for our executives and other senior employees involves a combination of cash and deferred equity awards in the form of Incentive Units and RSUs (as defined in Note 1 to the Financial Statements). The proportion of compensation that is deferred and at risk of forfeiture generally increases as an employee’s level of compensation rises. Employees at higher total compensation levels are generally targeted to receive a greater percentage of their total compensation payable in Incentive Units and RSUs. To further align their interests with those of investors in our products, our employees have the opportunity to make investments in or alongside our products. We also provide our employees robust health and other wellness offerings, as well as a variety of quality of life benefits, including
time-off
and family planning resources. We believe our approach to compensation and benefits are consistent with companies in the alternative asset management industry and enables us to attract and retain
best-in-class
talent in our industry. Our senior management periodically reviews the effectiveness and competitiveness of our compensation program.
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
Blue Owl is committed to fostering, cultivating, and preserving a culture of diversity, equity and inclusion. We prize diversity in our team and seek to create an inclusive, merit-based environment that is supportive of people from all backgrounds.
 
   
Embracing our differences.
We embrace and encourage our differences that make us unique. We believe that a team comprised of individuals with diverse backgrounds, experiences, perspectives and insights is critical to the long-term success of our firm.
 
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Strategic priorities.
Continuing to develop as a more diverse, equitable and inclusive firm is a strategic priority for Blue Owl that we believe will further enhance our work environment and overall business. Our commitment to diversity and inclusion is relevant to all areas of the firm’s business.
 
   
Corporate practices.
We focus on diversity, equity and inclusion in our corporate practices and policies, including: recruitment and hiring; compensation and benefits; professional development and training; promotions; transfers; and social and recreational programs. We also believe diversity, equity, and inclusion is an important component of any environmental, social, and governance program, and are committed to actively engaging with our investment teams on integrating our corporate philosophy into our investment culture.
 
   
Leadership.
While our ongoing efforts are championed at the Blue Owl founder-level and executed upon by senior leaders across all business areas of the firm, we strongly believe that these efforts should be employee led. Our aim is to have diversity, equity and inclusion be part of the very fiber of our entire employee population.
 
MUTUAL RESPECT
  
EXCELLENCE
  
CONSTRUCTIVE DIALOGUE
  
ONE TEAM
BLUE OWL’S CORE VALUES
Recent Developments
Dividend
On February 17, 2022, the Company announced a cash dividend of $0.10 per Class A Share. The dividend was payable on March 7, 2022, to holders of record as of the close of business on February 28, 2022.
2032 Notes
On February 15, 2022, the Company, through its indirect subsidiary, Blue Owl Finance LLC, issued $400.0 million aggregate principal amount of 4.375% Senior Notes due 2032 (the “2032 Notes”). The 2032 Notes bear interest at a rate of 4.375% per annum and mature on February 15, 2032. Interest on the 2032 Notes will be payable semi-annually in arrears on February 15 and August 15 of each year, commencing August 15, 2022.
The 2032 Notes are fully and unconditionally guaranteed, jointly and severally, by the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships and certain of their subsidiaries. The guarantees are unsecured and unsubordinated obligations of the guarantors. All or a portion of the 2032 Notes may be redeemed at the Company’s option in whole, at any time, or in part, from time to time, prior to their stated maturity, subject to a make-whole redemption price; provided, however, that if the Company redeems any amounts on or after November 15, 2031, the redemption price for the 2032 Notes will be equal to 100% of the principal amount of the amounts redeemed, in each case, plus any accrued and unpaid interest. If a change of control repurchase event occurs, the 2032 Notes are subject to repurchase by the Company at a repurchase price in cash equal to 101% of the aggregate principal amount repurchased plus any accrued and unpaid interest. The 2032 Notes also provide for customary events of default and acceleration.
Wellfleet Acquisition
On April 1, 2022, the Company closed its acquisition of Wellfleet Credit Partners LLC (“Wellfleet”) from affiliates of Littlejohn & Co., LLC. The purchase price consisted of $108.0 million cash consideration on closing and earnout payments of up to an additional $15.0 million of cash and 940,668 Class A Shares payable in equal installments on each of the first three anniversaries from the closing date.
 
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Charter Amendment
On April 6, 2022, the Board adopted resolutions authorizing an amendment to the Company’s certificate of incorporation (as amended, the “certificate of incorporation”) to change the aggregate voting power of the Class B Shares and Class D Shares, from 90% to 80% as set forth in the First Amendment to the Certificate of Incorporation (the “Charter Amendment”). The amendment is designed to position the Corporation for potential inclusion in the Russell indicies. The Charter Amendment was approved by the written consent of stockholders of the Company representing a majority of the voting power of the outstanding Class A Shares, Class B Shares, Class C Shares, and Class D Shares of the Company voting together as a single class, stockholders representing a majority of the Class B Shares and Class D Shares, voting together as a single class, and stockholders representing a majority of the Class B Shares and Class D Shares, voting as separate classes as of April 6, 2022. No other votes are required or necessary to adopt the certificate of incorporation. The Charter Amendment will become effective upon its filing with the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware on May 3, 2022.
Organizational Structure
Blue Owl is a publicly traded holding company, and its primary assets are ownership interests in the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships, which are held indirectly through Blue Owl GP. We conduct our business through the Blue Owl Operating Group. See Note 1 to our Financial Statements for a description of the various share and unit classes outstanding at the Blue Owl and Blue Owl Operating Partnership levels.
 
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The diagram below depicts a simplified version of our organizational structure as of December 31, 2021. Ownership percentages are based on shares and units that are fully participating in dividends and distributions as of December 31, 2021.
 
Economic and voting percentages above do not include the potential dilutive impact of the exercise of warrants to purchase Class A Shares, as well as RSUs, unvested Incentive Units and Oak Street Earnout Units, as these interests do not participate in dividends and distributions (other than to the extent of certain tax distributions on unvested Incentive Units). See Note 1 to our consolidated and combined financial statements for additional information on these interests.
 
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Corporation Information
Blue Owl Capital Inc. is a Delaware corporation. Our principal executive offices are located at 399 Park Avenue, 38th Floor, New York, NY 10022 and our telephone number at that address is
(212) 419-3000.
Our website is located at www.blueowl.com. Our website and the information contained on, or accessed through, our website are not part of this prospectus, and you should rely only on the information contained in this prospectus when making a decision as to whether to invest in our Class A Shares.
 
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Risk Factor Summary
The following is a summary of the risks and uncertainties that could adversely affect our business and financial condition and should be read in conjunction with the complete discussion of risk factors set forth in “
Risk Factors.
” Some of the factors that could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows include, but are not limited to, the following:
 
 
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused severe disruptions in the US and global economy, has disrupted, and may continue to disrupt, industries in which we, our products and our products’ portfolio companies and investments operate and could potentially negatively impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
Intense competition among alternative asset managers may make fundraising and the deployment of capital more difficult, thereby limiting our ability to grow or maintain our FPAUM. Such competition may be amplified by changes in fund investor allocations away from alternative asset managers.
 
 
We recently ceased to be an emerging growth company, and now are being required to comply with certain heightened reporting requirements. Fulfilling our obligations incident to being a public company, including compliance with the Exchange Act and the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the Dodd-Frank Act, are expensive and time-consuming, and any delays or difficulties in satisfying these obligations could have a material adverse effect on our future results of operations and our stock price.
 
 
Difficult market and political conditions, including tensions between Russia and Ukraine, may reduce the value or hamper the performance of the investments made by our products or impair the ability of our products to raise or deploy capital, each of which could materially reduce our revenue, earnings and cash flow and adversely affect our financial prospects and condition.
 
 
Management fees comprise the majority of our revenues and a reduction in fees could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and the level of cash available for distributions to our shareholders.
 
 
Our growth depends in large part on our ability to raise new and successor funds. If we were unable to raise such funds, the growth of our FPAUM and management fees, and ability to deploy capital into investments, earning the potential for performance income, would slow or decrease, all of which would materially reduce our revenues and cash flows and adversely affect our financial condition.
 
 
Our GP Capital Solutions products may suffer losses if our Partner Managers are unable to raise new funds or grow their AUM.
 
 
Conflicts of interest may arise in our allocation of capital and co-investment opportunities or in circumstances where we hold investments at different levels of the capital structure.
 
 
Our business is currently focused on multiple investment strategies.
 
 
Our entitlement and that of certain of our shareholders, Principals and employees to receive realized performance income from certain of our funds may create an incentive for us to make more speculative investments and determinations on behalf of our funds than would be the case in the absence of such performance income.
 
 
Our use of leverage to finance our businesses exposes us to substantial risks. Any security interests or negative covenants required by a credit facility we enter into may limit our ability to create liens on assets to secure additional debt.
 
 
Employee misconduct could harm us by impairing our ability to attract and retain fund investors and subjecting us to significant legal liability, regulatory scrutiny and reputational harm.
 
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Cybersecurity risks and cyber incidents could adversely affect our business by causing a disruption to our operations, a compromise or corruption of our confidential information and confidential information in our possession and damage to our business relationships, any of which could negatively impact our business, financial condition and operating results.
 
 
The use of leverage by our products may materially increase the returns of such funds but may also result in significant losses or a total loss of capital.
 
 
The multi-class structure of our common stock has the effect of concentrating voting power with the Principals, which will limit an investor’s ability to influence the outcome of important transactions, including a change in control.
 
 
The Registrant is a holding company and its only material source of cash is its indirect interest (held through Blue Owl GP) in the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships, and it is accordingly dependent upon distributions made by its subsidiaries to pay taxes, cause Blue Owl GP to make payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement, and pay dividends.
 
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The Offering
The following information is as of April 20, 2022 and does not give effect to issuances of our Class A Shares after such date.
 
Issuer
Blue Owl Capital Inc.
 
Class A Shares offered by the Selling Holders
Up to 1,320,591,340 Class A Shares (including 1,010,627,237 Class A Shares that were issued upon the conversion or conversion and exchange of Seller Earnout Securities, as applicable, and the exchange of Common Units and the cancellation of an equal number of Class C or Class D Shares, as applicable)
 
Class A Shares issued or issuable upon the exchange of all outstanding Common Units and the conversion or conversion and exchange of all Seller Earnout Securities
1,343,042,262
 
Use of proceeds
We will not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of the Class A Shares by the Selling Holders.
 
Market for our shares of common stock
Our Class A Shares are currently listed on the NYSE under the symbol “OWL.”
 
Risk factors
Any investment in the securities offered hereby is speculative and involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the information set forth under “
Risk Factors
” and elsewhere in this prospectus.
 
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SELECTED HISTORICAL CONSOLIDATED AND
COMBINED FINANCIAL INFORMATION OF BLUE OWL
The following tables provide our selected historical consolidated and combined financial and other data for the periods indicated. We have derived the selected consolidated statement of operations data for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 and the selected consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2021 and 2020 from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The following summary historical financial information should be read together with the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes and “
Blue Owl’s Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
” appearing elsewhere in this prospectus. The summary historical financial information in this section is not intended to replace our consolidated financial statements and the related notes. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of our future results, and our results as of and for the year ended December 31, 2021 are not necessarily indicative of our results in any future period.
 
($ amounts in thousands)
  
December 31, 2021
    
December 31, 2020
   
December 31, 2019
 
Consolidated statements of financial condition data
                         
Total assets
   $ 8,266,398      $ 121,597     $ 56,718  
Debt obligations, net
     1,174,167        356,386       287,104  
Total liabilities
     2,418,828        622,758       407,215  
Non-controlling
interests
     4,184,003        6,526       2,259  
Total shareholders’ equity attributable to Blue Owl Inc. (After May 19, 2021) / members of Owl Rock Capital and sole member of Owl Rock Capital Securities LLC (Prior to May 19, 2021)
     1,663,567        (507,687     (352,756
Total shareholders’ equity (deficit)
     5,847,570        (501,161     (350,497
 
    
For the Years Ended December 31,
 
($ amounts in thousands)
  
    2021    
    
    2020    
    
    2019    
 
                      
Consolidated statements of operations data
                          
Total revenues, net
   $ 823,878      $ 249,815      $ 190,850  
Total expenses
     1,751,145        308,542        163,483  
Interest expense
     (27,275)        (23,816)        (6,662)  
    
 
 
    
 
 
    
 
 
 
Net income (loss) before income taxes
     (1,867,477)        (82,543)        20,705  
Income tax (benefit) expense
     (65,211)        (102)        240  
    
 
 
    
 
 
    
 
 
 
Net income (loss) including
non-controlling
interests
     (1,802,266)        (82,441)        20,465  
    
 
 
    
 
 
    
 
 
 
Add: Net (income) loss attributed to
non-controlling
interests
     1,426,095        4,610        2,493  
    
 
 
    
 
 
    
 
 
 
Net income (loss) attributable to Blue Owl Capital Inc. (After May 19, 2021) / members of Owl Rock Capital and sole member of Owl Rock Capital Securities LLC (Prior to May 19, 2021)
   $     (376,171)      $     (77,831)      $     22,958  
    
 
 
    
 
 
    
 
 
 
 
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MARKET PRICE, TICKER SYMBOL, AND DIVIDEND INFORMATION
Market Price and Ticker Symbol
Blue Owl’s Class A Shares and public warrants are listed for trading on NYSE under the symbols “OWL” and “OWL.WS,” respectively.
The closing price of the Class A Shares on April 20, 2022 was $14.33. Holders of Class A Shares and warrants should obtain current market quotations for their securities.
Dividends
We intend to continue to pay to Class A Stockholders (and Class B Stockholders in the future to the extent any Class B Shares are outstanding) a quarterly dividend representing approximately 85% of Distributable Earnings following the end of each quarter. Blue Owl Capital Inc.’s share of Distributable Earnings, subject to adjustment as determined by our Board to be necessary or appropriate to provide for the conduct of our business, to make appropriate investments in our business and products, to comply with applicable law, any of our debt instruments or other agreements, or to provide for future cash requirements such as
tax-related
payments, operating reserves, clawback obligations and dividends to stockholders for any ensuing quarter. All of the foregoing is subject to the qualification that the declaration and payment of any dividends are at the sole discretion of our Board, and our Board may change our dividend policy at any time, including, without limitation, to reduce or eliminate dividends entirely.
The Blue Owl Operating Partnerships will make cash distributions (“Tax Distributions”) to the partners of such partnerships, including to Blue Owl GP, if we determine that the taxable income of the relevant partnership will give rise to taxable income for its partners. Generally, Tax Distributions will be computed based on our estimate of the taxable income of the relevant partnership allocable to a partner multiplied by an assumed tax rate equal to the highest effective marginal combined U.S. federal, New York State and New York City income tax rates prescribed for an individual or corporate resident in New York City (taking into account certain assumptions set forth in the relevant partnership agreements). Tax Distributions will be made only to the extent distributions from the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships for the relevant year were otherwise insufficient to cover the estimated assumed tax liabilities.
Holders of our Class A and B Shares may not always receive distributions or may receive lower distributions on a per share basis at a time when we, indirectly through Blue Owl GP, and holders of our Common Units are receiving distributions on their interests, as distributions to the Registrant and Blue Owl GP may be used to settle tax and TRA liabilities, if any, and other obligations.
Dividends are expected to be treated as qualified dividends under current law to the extent of the Company’s current and accumulated earnings and profits, with any excess dividends treated as a return of capital to the extent of a stockholder’s basis, and any remaining excess generally treated as gain realized on the sale or other disposition of stock.
 
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RISK FACTORS
In addition to the other information contained in this prospectus, the following risks have the potential to impact the business and operations of Blue Owl. These risk factors are not exhaustive and all investors are encouraged to perform their own investigation with respect to the business, financial condition and prospects of Blue Owl. Unless otherwise indicated or the context otherwise requires, references in this “Risk Factors” section to “Blue Owl,” “we,” “our,” “us” and other similar terms refer to Blue Owl Capital Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries.
Risks Related to Our Business and Operations
The
COVID-19
pandemic has caused severe disruptions in the U.S. and global economy, has disrupted, and may continue to disrupt, industries in which we, our products and our products’ investments operate and could potentially negatively impact us, our products or our products’ investments.
The
COVID-19
pandemic has adversely impacted global commercial and economic activity and contributed to significant volatility in certain equity and debt markets. The impact of the outbreak continues to develop and many countries, including the United States, and states and municipalities in which we and our products’ investments operate, have instituted quarantines, prohibitions on travel and the closure of offices, businesses, schools, retail stores and other public venues. Individual businesses and industries are also implementing similar precautionary measures. Those measures, as well as the general uncertainty surrounding the dangers and effects of
COVID-19,
have created significant disruption in supply chains and economic activity and are having a particularly adverse impact on transportation, hospitality, tourism, commercial real estate, entertainment and other industries, including industries in which certain of our products, borrowers, Partner Managers and their respective investments operate and invest. The effects of
COVID-19
have led to significant volatility and it is uncertain how long this volatility will continue. As
COVID-19
continues to spread, particularly as new variants, including the Delta and Omicron variants, continue to emerge, the potential effects, including a global, regional or other economic recession, are increasingly uncertain and difficult to assess. This uncertainty has been exacerbated by issues with the availability and acceptance of vaccines both in the United States and globally. The continued spread of the virus globally could lead to a protracted world-wide economic downturn, the effects of which could last for some period after the pandemic is controlled and/or abated.
The extent of the impact of the
COVID-19
pandemic on us and our products’ operational and financial performance will depend on many factors, including the duration and scope of the public health emergency, the actions taken by governmental authorities to contain its financial and economic impact, the continued or renewed implementation of travel advisories and restrictions, the widespread availability and acceptance of vaccines, the impact of the public health emergency on overall supply and demand, staffing and attrition levels, consumer confidence and levels of economic activity and the extent of its disruption to global, regional and local supply chains and economic markets, all of which are uncertain and difficult to assess. Significant volatility and declines in valuations in the global markets as well as liquidity concerns may impair our ability to raise funds or deter fund investors from investing in new or successor funds that we are marketing. Actions taken in response to the
COVID-19
pandemic (whether imposed by governments or adopted by businesses or individuals) may give rise to difficulty marketing and raising new or successor funds due to
shelter-in-place
orders, travel restrictions and social distancing requirements implemented or undertaken in response to the
COVID-19
pandemic, which may lower or delay anticipated fee revenues. For existing funds, those actions may slow the pace of investment activity, by, for example, hindering the diligence process. This, in turn, could adversely affect the timing of raising capital for new or successor funds, the terms that might be offered and the management fees we earn on our products that generate fees based on invested (and not committed) capital. In addition, cash flows from management fees may be impacted by, among other things, a failure of our clients to meet capital calls. Borrowers of loans and other credit instruments made by our products may be unable to make their loan payments on a timely basis and meet their loan covenants, resulting in a decrease in value of our products’ credit investments and lower than expected returns.
 
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We are continuing to monitor the impact of
COVID-19
and related risks, including risks related to the ongoing spread of
COVID-19
(including the Delta and Omicron variants) and efforts to mitigate the spread and deployment of vaccines. However, the rapid development and fluidity of the situation precludes any prediction as to its ultimate impact on us. If the spread and related mitigation efforts continue, our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be materially adversely affected. The impact of
COVID-19
could have the effect of heightening many of the other risk factors described herein.
Difficult market and political conditions may reduce the value or hamper the performance of the investments made by our products or impair the ability of our products to raise or deploy capital, each of which could materially reduce our revenue, earnings and cash flow and adversely affect our financial prospects and condition.
Our businesses are affected by conditions and trends in the global financial markets and the global economic and political climate relating to, among other things, interest rates, the availability and cost of credit, inflation rates, economic uncertainty, changes in laws (including laws relating to our taxation, taxation of our clients and the possibility of changes to regulations applicable to alternative asset managers), trade policies, commodity prices, tariffs, currency exchange rates and controls, political elections and administration transitions, and national and international political events (including wars and the most recent and rapidly evolving tensions between Russia and Ukraine as well as other forms of conflict, terrorist acts, and security operations) and catastrophic events such as fires, floods, earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes and pandemics. Those factors are outside of our control and may affect the level and volatility of credit and securities prices and the liquidity and value of fund investments, and we and our products may not be able to or may choose not to manage our exposure to these conditions. The extent and impact of any sanctions imposed in connection with the escalation of hostilities between Russia and Ukraine may cause additional financial market volatility and impact the global economy as the situation continues to evolve.
During periods of difficult market conditions or slowdowns, which may be across one or more industries, sectors or geographies, companies in which our funds invest may experience decreased revenues, financial losses, credit rating downgrades, difficulty in obtaining access to financing and increased funding costs. During such periods, those companies may also have difficulty in pursuing growth strategies, expanding their businesses and operations (including to the extent that they are Partner Managers, raising additional capital) and be unable to meet their debt service obligations or other expenses as they become due, including obligations and expenses payable to our funds. Negative financial results in our funds’ portfolio companies may reduce the net asset value of our funds, result in the impairment of assets and reduce the investment returns for our products, which could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and cash flow or ability to raise additional capital through new or successor funds. In addition, those conditions would increase the risk of default with respect to credit-oriented or debt investments by our products.
We recently ceased to be an emerging growth company, and now are being required to comply with certain heightened reporting requirements. Fulfilling our obligations incident to being a public company, including compliance with the Exchange Act and the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the Dodd-Frank Act, are expensive and time-consuming, and any delays or difficulties in satisfying these obligations could have a material adverse effect on our future results of operations and our stock price.
As a public company, we are subject to the reporting, accounting and corporate governance requirements of the NYSE, the Exchange Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”) and Section 619 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) that apply to issuers of listed equity, which impose certain significant compliance requirements, costs and obligations upon us. On October 7, 2021, we ceased to be an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act. The changes necessitated by being a publicly listed company and ongoing compliance with these rules and regulations require a significant commitment of additional resources and management oversight, which increases our operating costs and could divert the attention of our management and personnel from other business concerns. Further, to
 
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continue to comply with the requirements of being a public company, we have undertaken various actions, such as implementing new internal controls and procedures and hiring additional accounting and internal audit staff.
The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires us, among other things, to maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. In order to maintain and improve the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting, we have expended, and anticipate that we will continue to expend, significant resources, including accounting-related costs and significant management oversight.
In addition, our internal resources and personnel may in the future be insufficient to avoid accounting errors, and our auditors may identify deficiencies, significant deficiencies or material weaknesses in our internal control environment in the future. Any failure to develop or maintain effective controls or any difficulties encountered implementing required new or improved controls could harm our operating results or cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations and may result in a restatement of our financial statements for prior periods. Any failure to implement and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting also could adversely affect the results of periodic management evaluations and annual independent registered public accounting firm attestation reports regarding the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting that we will eventually be required to include in our periodic reports that will be filed with the SEC. Ineffective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting could also cause investors in our common stock or investors in our products to lose confidence in our reported financial and other information, which would likely have a negative effect on the trading price of our common stock and/or investors’ confidence in our products. In addition, if we are unable to continue to meet these requirements, we may not be able to remain listed on the NYSE.
The expenses associated with being a public company include increases in auditing, accounting and legal fees and expenses, investor relations expenses, increased directors’ fees and director and officer liability insurance costs, registrar and transfer agent fees and listing fees. As a public company, we are required to, among other things, institute comprehensive compliance and investor relations functions. These obligations and constituents require significant attention from our senior management and could divert their attention away from the
day-to-day
management of our business, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition, cash flows and results of operation. Failure to comply with the requirements of being a public company could potentially subject us to sanctions or investigations by the SEC or other regulatory authorities.
In addition, changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure are creating uncertainty for public companies, increasing legal and financial compliance costs and making some activities more time consuming. We intend to invest resources to comply with evolving laws, regulations and standards, and this investment may result in increased general and administrative expenses. If our efforts to comply with new laws, regulations and standards differ from the activities intended by regulatory or governing bodies due to ambiguities related to their application and practice, regulatory authorities may initiate legal proceedings against us, and there could be a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, cash flows and results of operations.
The management fees of our BDCs and management fees and performance income of our private funds comprise a substantial majority of our revenues and a reduction in fees could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and the level of cash available for distributions to our stockholders.
BDCs
The investment advisory agreements we have with each of our BDCs categorize the fees we receive as: (a) base management fees, which are paid quarterly and generally increase or decrease based on the average fair value of our BDC’s gross assets (excluding cash and cash equivalents) or average fair value of gross assets (excluding cash) plus undrawn commitments, (b) Part I Fees and (c) Part II Fees. We classify the Part I Fees as management fees because they are predictable and recurring in nature, not subject to contingent repayment and
 
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generally cash-settled each quarter. If any of our BDCs’ gross assets or net investment income (before Part I Fees and Part II Fees) were to decline significantly for any reason, including, without limitation, due to fair value accounting requirements, the poor performance of its investments or the inability or increased cost to obtain or maintain borrowings for each of our BDCs, the amount of the fees we receive from our BDCs, including the base management fee and the Part I Fees, would also decline significantly, which could have an adverse effect on our revenues and results of operations. In addition, because the Part II Fees are not paid unless each of our BDCs achieves cumulative aggregate realized capital gains (net of cumulative aggregate realized capital losses and aggregate unrealized capital depreciation), each of our BDCs’ Part II Fees payable to us are variable and not predictable. Our advisory agreements typically provide that the rates at which we earn advisory fees from our BDCs increase after our BDCs are publicly listed (where before the listing the advisory fees typically are a reduced management fee with a reduced or no Part I or II fees). If our BDCs do not become publicly listed on anticipated timeframes or at all for any reason, including the poor share performance of our BDCs, Blue Owl will not benefit from this increase, and those BDCs may need to return their capital to investors, further reducing our management fees. We may also, from time to time, (a) waive or voluntarily defer any fees payable to us by our BDCs or any BDCs that we may manage after the date hereof and (b) restructure any existing fee waivers granted by us to our BDCs so that such of our BDCs will be obligated to pay fee amounts that are less than the full fee amounts owed to us pursuant to the terms of the applicable advisory agreement between us and such BDC, and the duration and extent of such waivers and deferrals in each of (a) and (b) may need to be significant to support continued fundraising. In addition to those arrangements, we have entered into and in the future may enter into expense supporting arrangements with certain of our BDCs where we pay or reimburse certain expenses of our BDCs in order to support their target dividend payments.
Our investment advisory and management agreements with our BDCs renew for successive annual periods subject to the approval of the applicable BDC’s board of directors or by the affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of such BDC’s outstanding voting securities. In addition, as required by the Investment Company Act, the investment advisory agreements with our BDCs generally may be terminated without penalty upon 60 days’ written notice to the other party. Termination or
non-renewal
of any of these agreements would reduce our revenues significantly and could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition.
Private Funds: Management Fees
For our other
non-BDC
Direct Lending products, as well as GP Capital Solutions and certain Real Estate products, which we refer to as our private funds, we enter into investment advisory agreements whereby we generally receive base management fees from the inception of such fund through the liquidation of such fund or for most of our GP Capital Solutions products for a set period.
Non-BDC
Direct Lending products have a base management fee that is typically based on a percentage of gross asset value (which includes the portion of such investments purchased with leverage), whereas our GP Capital Solutions products have a management fee that is initially a set percentage of capital committed by investors, and then, following a step down event for a Dyal Capital fund (generally either the end of the investment period or, for certain funds, when the fund’s commitments become substantially invested or drawn), is adjusted to a lower percentage of the fund’s cost of unrealized investments, subject to impairment losses for certain funds. Following the management fee step down event, the management fee we receive will be reduced when a fund realizes investments or in certain cases when there are permanent changes to the cost basis of unrealized investments. While those funds are not required to realize assets as of any date, there is an obligation to explore liquidity strategies with respect to a fund, and should a liquidity strategy event occur prior to the management fee end date, it could cause a reduction in the amount of management fees we are otherwise entitled to receive. Further, any realization of assets will be within the control of certain of our employees who own an interest in a portion of the carried interest that does not belong to us and who may have an incentive to effect a realization earlier than one otherwise would expect had carried interest not been applicable.
As our private funds generally have end dates for paying management fees, our revenues will decline in respect of such funds if we are unable to successfully raise successor funds that replace the management fee
 
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payments that terminate on the older funds or such successor funds do not generate fees at the same rate. Additionally, given that such management fees are often based on gross asset value, acquisition costs or invested capital, either throughout the fund term or, in some cases following their investment period, the management fee received in respect of such fund will be reduced when a fund realizes investments or if the value of an investment is impaired. During the investment period of many funds, the fund expects to actively recycle capital into new investments, which would have the impact of replacing investments that have been realized during the investment period, but there are many factors that may limit our ability to effectively recycle capital and realize the full fee potential of any particular fund. For many Direct Lending funds, the gross asset value used as the base for the management fee includes investments purchased with leverage. If we are unable to obtain leverage at the expected level, or at all, this will have a negative impact on our ability to realize the full fee potential of any particular fund.
Further, our right to receive management fees can be impaired by certain actions of investors in a private fund. Our private funds generally provide investors with: (1) the right to terminate such fund on both a cause basis and a no fault basis; (2) the right to remove us as manager of a fund for cause; and (3) the right to create an early step down event with respect to a fund on a cause basis. If the investors exercised their right to vote for an early termination, we would typically continue to receive management fee through the liquidation of such fund, but we could face pressure to liquidate investments earlier than we otherwise believe is appropriate to maximize the value of such investment. Certain funds also provide investors with the right to remove the general partner of such fund on a cause basis. Upon the removal of the general partner of a fund becoming effective, the investment advisory contract in respect of such fund will cease to exist and our rights to payment of management fee will terminate. In some cases, investors may also have the right to redeem after certain periods of time or following regulatory or key person concerns, which would also reduce the base on which fees are charged. In other cases, after an initial lock up period, investors may issue redemption notices with respect to their interests; as such interests are redeemed, the fees will decrease unless we are able to find new investors to replace those redeeming.
Notwithstanding the formulas for calculating management fees provided in the governing documents for our products, Blue Owl has provided (and expects to provide in the future) discounts to investors on such fees based on the size of their commitments to the fund (or Blue Owl funds generally), the timing of their commitments to the fund or other factors that Blue Owl deems relevant. Certain investors are effectively given management fee discounts through specified interests and discounts with respect to carried interest or performance income through the grant of participation rights, fee rebates or revenue shares. Although such discounts will typically be awarded in circumstances where Blue Owl management believes there will ultimately be long-term benefits to Blue Owl, there can be no assurance that the ultimate benefit attained will be commensurate with the discount awarded, or as to how long it may take to recoup such value.
Private Funds: Carried Interest
The general partner or an affiliate of certain of our private funds that are not BDCs may be entitled to receive carried interest from a fund based on cumulative fund performance to date. Carried interest entitles the general partner (or an affiliate) to a special allocation of income and gains from a fund, and is typically structured as a net profits interest in the applicable fund. Carried interest is generally calculated on a “realized” basis, and the recipient is generally entitled to a carried interest based upon the net realized income and gains often taking into account certain unrealized losses generated by such fund. Net realized income/gains or loss is not netted between or among funds.
If the investments we make on behalf of our funds or separate accounts perform poorly, we may suffer a decline in our realized performance income, which may limit our ability to pay dividends. For most funds, the carried interest is subject to a preferred return of 8%, subject in most cases to a
catch-up
allocation to the general partner. Generally, if at the termination of fund, the fund has not achieved investment returns that exceed the preferred return threshold, the general partner may not be entitled to a share of the carried interest. Additionally, similar to management fees as described above, if the fund is terminated early by the investors or the general
 
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partner is removed by the investors of a fund, this may have a negative impact on the value of investments, which will then reduce the carried interest allocations to the general partner, and, in the instance where the general partner is removed for cause, a penalty reduction may be assessed against any remaining carried interest. Amounts that could otherwise go to satisfy dividend payments may be deferred or reserved to satisfy potential repayment obligations.
Although Blue Owl is only entitled to 15% of this realized performance income, the remainder of this revenue stream is owned by entities not controlled by us, including to investors in such entities that otherwise might serve as professionals of Blue Owl. Blue Owl may be misaligned from these investors, as a portion of this income would qualify for long-term capital gains in the hands of such individuals, whereas Blue Owl, as a U.S. corporation, will not receive preferential treatment for long-term capital gains and may be limited in deducting capital losses. Furthermore, to the extent such investors currently benefit from such long-term capital gains treatment, they may not be entitled to this treatment in perpetuity. For example, U.S. federal income tax law now generally imposes a three-year holding period requirement for carried interest to be treated as long-term capital gain. The holding period requirement may result in some of the carried interest received by such persons being treated as ordinary income, which would materially increase the amount of taxes paid by such persons. The tax treatment of carried interest may continue to be area of attention for the federal and state governments.
Other Fee Income
We also receive fee income for providing services to certain portfolio companies of our products. Such services include arrangement, syndication, origination, structuring analysis, capital structure and business plan advice and other services. Certain types of transaction-related fees are required to be distributed to the Blue Owl funds and other products under the terms of our
Co-investment
Exemptive Order, as discussed in
“Conflicts of interest may arise in connection with
co-investments
between our private funds and our BDCs”
below, or are required to be distributed to investors in our products or offset against management fees that would otherwise be payable pursuant to the terms of the governing agreements of the relevant vehicles, while other types of related fees may be retained by us with no offset against management fees and contribute to our revenues and, ultimately, to our net income. We may decide not to seek those fees for any reason, including market conditions and expectations. Our ability to receive and retain those fees, and to continue to receive and retain those fees in the future, is dependent on the terms we negotiate with investors in our products, our ability to successfully negotiate for those fees with underlying portfolio companies, the permissibility of receiving and retaining those fees under the relevant legal and regulatory frameworks, and our business determination to negotiate for those fees. As a result, any change to the willingness of portfolio companies to bear those fees, the terms of our products that permit us to receive and retain those fees, the legal and regulatory framework in which we operate or our willingness to negotiate for those fees with portfolio companies of our products, could result in a decrease to our revenues and net income, and ultimately decrease the value of our common stock and our dividends to our stockholders. In addition, the fees generated are typically dependent on transaction frequency and volume, and a slowdown in the pace or size of investments by our products could adversely affect the amount of fees generated.
Our growth depends in large part on our ability to raise new and successor funds. If we were unable to raise such funds, the growth of our FPAUM and management fees, and ability to deploy capital into investments, earning the potential for performance income, would slow or decrease, all of which would materially reduce our revenues and cash flows and adversely affect our financial condition.
A significant portion of our revenue from our products in any given period is dependent on the size of our FPAUM in such period and fee rates charged on the FPAUM. We may not be successful in procuring investment returns and prioritizing services that will allow us to maintain our current fee structure, to maintain or grow our FPAUM, or to generate performance income. A decline in the size or pace of growth of FPAUM or applicable fee rates will reduce our revenues. A decline in the size or pace of growth of FPAUM or applicable fee rates may result from a range of factors, including:
 
   
Volatile economic and market conditions, which could cause fund investors to delay making new commitments to alternative investment funds or limit the ability of our existing funds to deploy capital;
 
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Intense competition among alternative asset managers may make fundraising and the deployment of capital more difficult, thereby limiting our ability to grow or maintain our FPAUM. Competition may be amplified by changes in fund investors allocating increased amounts of capital away from alternative asset managers; and
 
   
Continuation or amplification of general trends within the investment management industry towards lower fees including through direct reductions, deferrals, rebates or other means, which may also result in our competitors operating based on fee structures with which we are unable to successfully compete.
In response to those trends, we may, in certain cases, lower the fees we charge or grant fee reductions or specified interests or periodic holidays in order to remain competitive;
 
   
Poor performance of one or more of our products, either relative to market benchmarks or in absolute terms (e.g., based on market value or net asset value of our BDCs’ shares), or compared to our competitors may cause fund investors to regard our funds less favorably than those of our competitors, thereby adversely affecting our ability to raise new or successor funds;
 
   
Our funds may engage in strategic transactions or other dispositions that reduce the cost basis upon which we charge management fees with respect to one or more of our funds. For example, a fund may sell all or a portion of its interests in portfolio companies that causes such fund’s management fee base to be reduced; and
 
   
Certain of our funds contain “key person” provisions or other provisions allowing investors to take actions following certain specified events. The occurrence of one or more of those events prior to the end of a fund’s investment period could result in the termination of a fund’s investment period and a material decrease in the management fees paid by such fund or, in certain cases, cessation of the funds.
Our products may suffer losses if our Partner Managers are unable to raise new funds or grow their AUM.
As our GP Capital Solutions products’ investments in Partner Managers are intended to be held for an indefinite duration, we are dependent upon the ability of our Partner Managers to execute successfully their investment program and grow their assets under management. In the event that a Partner Manager is unable to grow their assets under management or such Partner Manager’s investment returns fail to meet expectations, the returns attributable to such investment may be reduced or our products may suffer a loss on such investment. A Partner Manager’s failure to grow assets under management may result from a range of factors common to asset managers, including factors to which we are subject ourselves, or specific factors attributable to its business including the departure of key persons, the inability of such Partner Manager to diversify into new investment strategies, investment performance and regulatory enforcement actions.
The investment management business is intensely competitive.
The investment management business is intensely competitive, with competition based on a variety of factors, including investment performance, business relationships, quality of service provided to clients, fund investor liquidity, fund terms (including fees and economic sharing arrangements), brand recognition and business reputation. Maintaining our reputation is critical to attracting and retaining fund investors and for maintaining our relationships with our regulators, sponsors, Partner Managers, potential
co-investors
and joint venture partners, as applicable. Negative publicity regarding our company, our personnel or our Partner Managers could give rise to reputational risk that could significantly harm our existing business and business prospects. We are also currently subject to and may be subject in the future to litigation between ourselves and our Partner Managers, which may harm our reputation.
Similarly, events could occur that damage the reputation of our industry generally, such as the insolvency or bankruptcy of large funds or a significant number of funds or highly publicized incidents of fraud or other scandals, any one of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, regardless of whether any of those events directly relate to our products or the investments made by our products.
 
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Our products compete with a number of specialized funds, corporate buyers, traditional asset managers, real estate companies, commercial banks, investment banks, other investment managers and other financial institutions, including certain of our stockholders, as well as domestic and international pension funds and sovereign wealth funds, and we expect that competition will continue to increase. In addition, our BDCs and other Direct Lending products compete with a number of other BDCs, private funds, commercial banks, and other financial institutions.
Numerous factors increase our competitive risks, including, but not limited to:
 
   
A number of our competitors may have or are perceived to have more expertise or financial, technical, marketing and other resources and more personnel than we do;
 
   
Some of our products may not perform as well as competitors’ funds or other available investment products;
 
   
Several of our competitors have raised significant amounts of capital, and many of them have similar investment objectives to ours, which may create additional competition for investment opportunities;
 
   
Some of our competitors may have lower fees or alternative fee arrangements that potential clients of ours may find more appealing;
 
   
Some of our competitors may have a lower cost of capital and access to funding sources that are not available to us, which may create competitive disadvantages for us with respect to our products, including our products that directly use leverage or rely on debt financing of their portfolio investments to generate superior investment returns;
 
   
Some of our competitors may have higher risk tolerances, different risk assessments or lower return thresholds than us, which could allow them to consider a wider variety of investments and to bid more aggressively than us or to agree to less restrictive legal terms and protections for investments that we want to make;
 
   
Some of our competitors may be subject to less regulation or conflicts of interest and, accordingly, may have more flexibility to undertake and execute certain businesses or investments than we do, bear less compliance expense than we do or be viewed differently in the marketplace;
 
   
Some of our competitors may have more flexibility than us in raising and deploying certain types of funds under the investment management contracts they have negotiated with their fund investors; and
 
   
Some of our competitors may offer a broader investment platform and more partnership opportunities to portfolio companies than we are able to offer.
Certain of our strategic relationship investors (including early-stage investors in new products) may be granted the right to participate in the net profits of our advisory business attributable to certain strategies or products.
Certain investors in our products have been granted, and may in the future receive various forms of, participation rights. with respect to certain strategies, product lines or products, including, but not limited to, the right to: (1) the net profits or gross revenues of certain businesses; (2) the gross management fee revenue derived from certain strategies; (3) shares in net operating income that would otherwise be earned by us with respect to management fees, and (4) shares in a percentage of management fees. To the extent gross revenue participations or similar arrangements are offered, they will reduce the revenue earned by us, but we will continue to bear all applicable expenses, even if the product is not generating positive cash flow. We may also offer our employees the opportunity to participate in certain types of these arrangements in certain circumstances as a way of compensating or incentivizing employees. There is generally no limitation on the size or the duration of future economic sharing arrangements.
In addition, in the ordinary course we may offer fee discounts to investors in existing and future funds and we expect to continue to waive fees for many or all of our
co-investments.
We currently expect, at least in certain
 
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instances, to continue to offer these economic sharing arrangements to our strategic relationship investors (which may include certain of our stockholders) in the future, which may reduce the revenues ultimately earned by us in respect of these products, although it is hoped in many instances this will be balanced by the broader strategic benefits.
Conflicts of interest may arise in our allocation of capital and
co-investment
opportunities.
As an asset manager with multiple clients, including our various product lines, we confront conflicts of interests relating to our investment activities and operations. In particular, our allocation of capital and
co-investment
opportunities across our products are subject to numerous actual or potential conflicts of interest. Although we have implemented policies and procedures to address those conflicts, our failure to effectively identify and address them could cause reputational harm and a loss of investor confidence in our business. It could also result in regulatory lapses that could lead to applicable penalties, as well as increased regulatory oversight of our business.
Potential conflicts of interest in allocation among funds
Certain of our products may have overlapping investment objectives, including funds that have different fee structures, and potential conflicts may arise with respect to our decisions regarding how to allocate investment opportunities among those funds. We may allocate an investment opportunity that is appropriate for two or more investment funds in a manner that excludes one or more funds or results in a disproportionate allocation based on factors or criteria that we determine, including but not limited to differences with respect to available capital, the current or anticipated size of a fund, minimum investment amounts, the remaining life of a fund, differences in investment objectives, guidelines or strategies, diversification, portfolio construction considerations and other considerations deemed relevant to us and in accordance with our policy. Although we have adopted investment allocation policies and procedures that are designed to ensure fair and equitable treatment over time, and expect these policies and procedures to continue to evolve, those policies and procedures will not eliminate all potential conflicts. Certain investment opportunities may be allocated to certain funds that have lower fees or to our
co-investment
funds that pay no fees. To the extent that those investments could otherwise have been allocated to funds generating FPAUM, our revenues will be less than what would otherwise have been generated were those investments made through fee paying structures.
Potential conflicts of interest in connection with
co-investments
between our private funds and our BDCs
Our BDCs are permitted to
co-invest
in portfolio companies with each other and with affiliated investment funds in negotiated transactions pursuant to an SEC order (the
“Co-investment
Exemptive Order”). Pursuant to that exemptive relief, our BDCs and other affiliated investment funds generally are permitted to make such
co-investments
if a “required majority” (as defined in Section 57(o) of the Investment Company Act) of such BDC’s directors (including the independent directors) makes certain conclusions in connection with the
co-investment
transaction, including that (1) the terms of the transaction, including the consideration to be paid, are reasonable and fair to such BDC and its stockholders and do not involve overreaching in respect of such BDC or its stockholders on the part of any person concerned, (2) the transaction is consistent with the interests of such BDC’s stockholders and with its investment objective and strategies, and (3) the investment by one of our BDCs and other affiliated investment funds would not disadvantage any other of our BDCs, and such BDC’s participation would not be on a basis different from or less advantageous than that on which the other BDCs or other affiliated investment funds are investing. The different investment objectives or terms of the BDCs and affiliated investment funds may result in a potential conflict of interest, including in connection with the allocation of investments among our BDCs and/or our affiliated investment funds pursuant to the
Co-investment
Exemptive Order or otherwise.
As a result of our structure, our GP Capital Solutions products are affiliated investment funds of our BDCs and are prohibited from
co-investing
with our BDCs, except as permitted by the Investment Company Act and
 
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the
Co-investment
Exemptive Order. Those restrictions may limit the ability of our GP Capital Solutions products to make certain investments they otherwise may have made, and subject our products to additional compliance and regulatory risk. While it is not currently anticipated that there will be substantial overlap in the investment opportunities pursued by our BDCs, on the one hand, and our GP Capital Solutions products, on the other hand, the
Co-investment
Exemptive Order will require that any opportunities that are appropriate for both our BDCs and our GP Capital Solutions products will need to be offered to our BDCs and any such investments, if made, will need to be conducted in compliance with the conditions of the
Co-Investment
Exemptive Order and other requirements under the Investment Company Act. These restrictions also apply to our other Direct Lending and Real Estate products and may apply to additional product lines in the future.
Conflicts related to investments by several of our products at different levels of the capital structure of a single portfolio company or Partner Manager.
Different funds that we advise and/or our BDCs may invest in a single portfolio company, including at different levels of the capital structure of the portfolio company. For example, in the normal course of business, one of our products may acquire debt positions in, or lend to, companies in which another of our products owns common equity securities or a subordinated debt position. This could occur at the time of, or subsequent to, the initial investment in the portfolio company. A direct conflict of interest could arise among the various debt holders and equity holders if the company were to experience financial distress. In addition, if one of our BDCs is an investor in a portfolio company alongside other of our BDCs or affiliated investment funds we advise that have invested in a different part of the portfolio company’s capital structure, the Investment Company Act may prohibit us from negotiating on behalf of any such fund in connection with a reorganization or restructuring of the portfolio company. While we have developed general guidelines regarding when two or more funds can invest in different parts of the same company’s capital structure and created a process that we employ to handle those conflicts when they arise, our decision to permit the investments to occur in the first instance or our judgment on how to minimize the conflict could be challenged. If we fail to appropriately address those conflicts, it could negatively impact our reputation and ability to raise additional funds and the willingness of counterparties to do business with us or result in potential litigation against us.
Conflicts of interest may arise in our allocation of costs and expenses, and we are subject to increased regulatory scrutiny and uncertainty with regard to those allocations.
As an asset manager with multiple funds, we regularly make determinations to allocate costs and expenses both among our funds and between our funds and their investment advisors. Certain of those allocation determinations are inherently subjective and virtually all of them are subject to regulatory oversight. Any allocation or allegation of, or investigation into, a potential violation could cause reputational harm and a loss of investor confidence in our business. It could also result in regulatory lapses and any applicable penalties, as well as increased regulatory oversight of our business. In addition, any determination to allocate fees to the applicable investment adviser or Blue Owl could negatively affect our net income, and ultimately decrease the value of our common stock and our dividends to our stockholders. Similar considerations arise when allocating expenses to, or away from vehicles to which specified interests apply.
Allocation of costs and expenses among our funds and between our funds and applicable management companies
We have a conflict of interest in determining whether certain costs and expenses are incurred in the course of operating our funds, including the extent to which services provided by certain employees and associated costs are allocable to certain funds. Our funds generally pay or otherwise bear all legal, accounting, filing, and other expenses incurred in connection with organizing and establishing the funds and the offering of interests in the funds. Such determinations often require subjective judgment and may result in the management company, rather than our funds, being allocated certain fees and expenses. In addition, our funds generally pay all expenses related to the operation of the funds and their investment activities, in certain cases subject to caps. We also
 
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determine, in our sole discretion, the appropriate allocation of investment-related expenses, including broken deal expenses, incurred in respect of unconsummated investments and expenses more generally relating to a particular investment strategy, among our products, vehicles and accounts participating or that would have participated in such investments or that otherwise participate in the relevant investment strategy, as applicable. That often requires judgment and could result in one or more of our funds bearing more or less of these expenses than other investors or potential investors in the relevant investments or a fund paying a disproportionate share, including some or all, of the broken deal expenses or other expenses incurred by potential investors. Any dispute regarding such allocations could lead to our funds having to bear some portion of these costs as well as reputational risk. In addition, for funds that do not pay or otherwise bear the costs and expenses described above because of the application of caps or otherwise, such amounts may be borne by the applicable management company, which will reduce the amount of net fee income we receive for providing advisory services to the funds. For example, Dyal Capital has developed a Business Services Platform that provides strategic services to Partner Managers. Certain expenses associated with the Business Services Platform (“BSP Expenses”) are allocated among, and payable by, each of the GP Minority Equity Investment funds (“Dyal Equity Funds”). Those Dyal Equity Funds are generally allocated an amount equal to their pro rata allocation of BSP Expenses based on the relative number of Partner Managers in which investments are held from time to time by each of those funds; provided that the amount of BSP Expenses borne by a particular Dyal Equity Fund is subject to certain caps specified in its respective governing documents. In addition, Dyal Fund V provides for a minimum payment for BSP Expenses, which to the extent such minimum exceeds Dyal Fund V’s otherwise allocable share of such expenses, reduces the amounts of BSP Expenses borne by the other Dyal Equity Funds. It is expected that any successor fund to Dyal Fund V would similarly share in BSP Expenses.
We are required to bear any BSP Expenses allocated to a Dyal Equity Fund that exceeds the fund’s cap on those expenses. In addition, in certain instances, we expect to determine not to allocate or charge certain BSP Expenses to the Dyal Equity Funds, or to a particular fund, in response to regulatory, fund investor relations, governance or other applicable considerations and determine instead for those BSP Expenses to be borne by us. Any such determination could have the effect of materially reducing the reimbursement payments received by us with respect to the Business Services Platform or result in losses attributable to certain activities thereof. The allocation methodology for allocating BSP Expenses and other similar expenses is complex and subject to interpretation. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that any conflict arising from these allocations of expenses will be resolved in a manner responsive to the interests of all of our clients, which could damage our reputation.
The activities of the Business Services Platform and the allocation of BSP expenses have in the past been subject to an SEC order. These and other expense allocation practices could in the future be subject to regulatory scrutiny.
Existing and future relationships between or among our Partner Managers, our products and their limited partners could give rise to actual or perceived conflicts of interest.
Certain of our GP Capital Solutions products’ Partner Managers directly or through their investment funds, own securities in Blue Owl or its subsidiaries. Additionally, Dyal Fund IV has a passive minority equity interest in Owl Rock Feeder and became an indirect equityholder in Blue Owl upon consummation of the Business Combination. As a result, Dyal Fund IV will, to the extent it holds shares of Blue Owl, be entitled to vote on matters submitted to stockholders of Blue Owl generally, including with respect to the election of directors. In addition, a controlled affiliate of Blue Owl will serve as investment manager to Dyal Fund IV. Dyal Fund IV may have different interests, including different investment horizons, than Blue Owl generally or the Dyal Principals specifically. However, any decision made with respect to holding or disposing of Dyal Fund IV’s interest in Blue Owl will be determined by such Blue Owl affiliate, as investment manager to Dyal Fund IV, in a manner consistent with its statutory and contractual duties to Dyal Fund IV. Because those decisions will be made independent from consideration of Blue Owl’s interests, they may, due to a range of factors, conflict with Blue Owl’s own interests at such time.
 
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GP Capital Solutions products hold minority, noncontrolling interests in a broad range of Partner Managers. Those Partner Managers may, from time to time, directly or through their funds, enter into transactions or other contractual arrangements with us or our products outside of the GP Minority Equity Investments strategy, including our private funds, BDCs and Real Estate products, or between or among one another in the ordinary course of business, which may result in additional conflicts of interest. None of those transactions or other contractual arrangements are believed to be currently material to our operations or performance but there may be material transactions entered into in the future.
Even if those relationships do not create actual conflicts, the perception of conflicts in the press or the financial community generally could create negative publicity with respect to Blue Owl, which could adversely affect the relationships of with our product investors.
Debt investments in Partner Manager investments by the funds.
Portfolio companies of funds managed by our Partner Managers may also be borrowers under debt facilities or instruments owned, arranged or managed by our BDCs or funds. In its capacity as agent or lender under such facilities or instruments, a BDC or fund is required to act in the best interests of its stockholders or investors. In certain circumstances, a BDC or fund may be required to take actions that may be adverse to the investments owned by funds managed by Partner Managers, which could adversely affect our relationships with the Partner Managers, or potentially impact the value of a GP Capital Solutions product’s investment in such Partner Manager. As a result, although we believe that the Business Combination has enhanced our ability to source investment opportunities for our BDCs and funds through, among other things, our enhanced relationships with Partner Managers, it also may result in additional conflicts of interest.
Our Real Estate products may enter into sale lease-back transactions with portfolio companies of funds managed by our Partner Managers or borrowers under debt facilities or instruments owned, arranged or managed by our BDCs or funds.
From time to time, companies in which our BDCs or funds, or funds managed by our Partner Managers, have invested or may invest, may enter into sale-leaseback transactions with our Real Estate products. These arrangements could result in our BDCs or funds, or funds managed by our Partner Managers, being creditors to, or equity owners of, such companies at the same time as those companies are tenants of our Real Estate products. If such a company were to encounter financial difficulty or default on its obligations as a borrower, our BDC or fund, or a fund managed by a Partner Manager, could be required to take actions that may be adverse to those of our Real Estate products in enforcing its rights under the relevant facilities or agreements, or vice versa.
Additional and unpredictable conflicts of interests may rise in the future.
In addition to the conflicts outlined above, we may experience conflicts of interest in connection with the management of our business affairs relating to and arising from a number of matters, including the amounts paid to us by our investment funds; services that may be provided by us and our affiliates to investments in which our investment funds invest (including the determination of whether or not to charge fees to our investments for our provision of such services); investments by our investment funds and our other clients, subject to the limitations of the Investment Company Act; our formation of additional investment funds; differing recommendations given by us to different clients; and our use of information gained from an investment funds’ investments used to inform investments by other clients, subject to applicable law.
Our products hold and make investments in Partner Managers and there may be provisions within our arrangements with Partner Managers that could affect our right to receive or share information or cause us to sell our interests in the Partner Manager.
The terms of our GP Capital Solutions products’ investments in Partner Managers generally include provisions relating to competitors of the Partner Managers, access to information about the Partner Managers and
 
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their business, and affirmative and negative confidentiality obligations regarding the Partner Managers. While we have an information control policy with restrictions regarding the sharing of a Partner Manager’s confidential information, such policy and related procedures may not reduce a Partner Manager’s concern over the sharing of confidential and competitively sensitive information. Certain Partner Managers that are engaged in managing funds focused on similar businesses as our other product lines may consider Blue Owl to be a competitor with respect to their business and may seek to invoke remedies available to them under the investment agreements or pursue other remedies. Potential remedies available to them under the investment agreements, as applicable, include limiting the rights of our products to receive confidential information from the Partner Manager regarding its business, requiring us to sequester confidential information received from the Partner Manager, or requiring us to sell our interests in the Partner Manager for fair value as determined under the relevant investment agreement. A forced sale of a Partner Manager interest may reduce the amount of fees we receive with respect to the applicable GP Capital Solutions product, and any reduction in information may impede our ability to supervise our funds’ investments. Further, the affiliation may hinder our GP Capital Solutions products’ ability to make future investments in Partner Managers who are in the same space and who may consider Blue Owl a competitor, including
follow-on
investments in existing Partner Managers and investments with new Partner Managers.
The operations of our business and related transactions may affect our reputation and relationship with our Partner Managers.
We are reliant upon our strong relationships with our Partner Managers for the continued growth and development of business. Due to the number of Partner Managers with which we have relationships, we may compete with existing or prospective Partner Managers, which could negatively impact our ability to attract new Partner Managers to our products who may seek relationships with
non-competitors
over concerns of sharing information with competitors or other potential conflicts, including the ability to exercise our fiduciary duties. Additionally, our investments in Partner Managers may affect our relationships with other sponsors that are key relationships for our lending businesses, because of similar concerns around information sharing or other reasons. While we intend to implement robust procedures to address any such conflict, such procedures may not reduce the perception that such conflicts exist and may make us a less attractive partner/investor.
Our entitlement and that of certain of our stockholders, Principals and employees to receive performance income from certain of our products may create an incentive for us to make more speculative investments and determinations on behalf of our products than would be the case in the absence of such performance income.
Some of our products receive performance-based fees. With respect to Dyal Funds I—V and their related
co-investment
vehicles, none of the carried interest will be allocated to us. Further, we will be allocated a portion of the carried interest attributable to future GP Capital Solutions and Direct Lending products as well as 15% of the carried interest in existing Real Estate products. If a new GP Capital Solutions product is formed to facilitate a secondary transaction with respect to any of Dyal Funds I—V (which would include, without limitation, any continuation fund or other new fund whose primary purpose is to acquire directly or indirectly all or a portion of the assets of or interests in the existing Dyal Fund), any carried interest generated by such fund will not be allocated to us, notwithstanding that such secondary vehicle is formed in the future. Realized performance income not allocated to us is allocated to certain of our stockholders, Principals and employees in vehicles not controlled by us. Carried interest and performance based fees or allocations may create an incentive for us or our investment professionals to make more speculative or riskier investments and determinations, directly or indirectly on behalf of our products, or otherwise take or refrain from taking certain actions than it would otherwise make in the absence of such carried interest or performance-based fees or allocations. It may also create incentives to influence how we establish economic terms for future funds. In addition, we may have an incentive to make exit determinations based on factors that maximize economics in favor of certain of our stockholders, Principals and employees relative to us and our
non-participating
stockholders. Our failure to appropriately address any actual, potential or perceived conflicts of interest resulting from our entitlement to receive performance income from many of our products could have a material adverse effect on our reputation,
 
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which could materially and adversely affect our business in a number of ways, including limiting our ability to raise additional funds, attract new clients or retain existing clients.
Our business is currently focused on multiple investment strategies.
We currently pursue, through our products, multiple investment strategies. While we believe that there may be certain synergies amongst the various strategies, there can be no assurance that the benefits will manifest or that there will not be unanticipated consequences resulting therefrom. Although we are seeking additional investment strategies, relative to more diversified asset managers, our products’ limited and specialized focus also leaves us more exposed to risks affecting the dual sectors in which our products invest. As our investment management program is not broadly diversified, we may be uniquely exposed to market, tax, regulatory and other risks affecting the sectors in which we invest. There can be no assurance that we will be able to take actions necessary to mitigate the effect of such risks or otherwise diversify our investment program to minimize such exposure.
Rising interest rates could have a substantial adverse effect on our business.
Rising interest rates could have a dampening effect on overall economic activity, the financial condition of our customers and the financial condition of the end customers who ultimately create demand for the capital we supply, all of which could negatively affect demand for our capital. Additionally, an increase in interest rates could make it difficult for us to obtain financing at attractive rates, impacting our ability to execute on our growth strategies or future acquisitions.
The anticipated benefits of the Oak Street Acquisition and other acquisitions that we may pursue under our growth strategy, may not be realized or may take longer than expected to realize.
The optimization of our combined operations following the Oak Street Acquisition, or any other acquisition that we may pursue under our growth strategy, will be a complex, costly and time-consuming process and if we experience difficulties in this process, the anticipated benefits may not be realized fully or at all, or may take longer to realize than expected, which could have an adverse effect on us for an undetermined period. There can be no assurances that we will realize the potential operating efficiencies, synergies and other benefits currently anticipated from any acquisition.
The integration of our business and Oak Street may present material challenges, including, without limitation:
 
   
combining the leadership teams and corporate cultures of us and Oak Street;
 
   
the diversion of management’s attention from ongoing business concerns and performance shortfalls at one or both of the businesses as a result of the devotion of management’s attention to the continuing integration of the businesses;
 
   
managing a larger combined business;
 
   
maintaining employee morale and retaining key management and other employees at the combined company, including by offering sufficiently attractive terms of employment;
 
   
retaining existing business and operational relationships, and attracting new business and operational relationships;
 
   
the possibility of faulty assumptions underlying expectations regarding the integration process;
 
   
consolidating corporate and administrative infrastructures and eliminating duplicative operations;
 
   
managing expense loads and maintaining currently anticipated operating margins given that our two businesses are different in nature and therefore may require additional personnel and compensation expenses, which expenses may be borne by us, rather than our products;
 
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difficulty replicating or replacing functions, systems and infrastructure provided by Neuberger or certain of its affiliates or the loss of benefits from Neuberger’s global contracts; and
 
   
unanticipated issues in integrating information technology, communications and other systems.
In addition, our growth strategy contemplates that we will pursue acquisitions of assets or business that are complementary to our business, such as the recently completed Wellfleet Acquisition. Some or all of the foregoing risks may arise in connection with integrating these acquisitions. Some of those factors are outside of our control, and any one of them could result in delays, increased costs, decreases in the amount of potential revenues or synergies, potential cost savings, and diversion of management’s time and energy, which could materially affect our financial position, results of operations, and cash flows.
We may continue to enter into new lines of business and expand into new investment strategies, geographic markets and businesses, each of which may result in upfront costs and additional risks and uncertainties in our businesses.
We intend, if market conditions warrant, to grow our businesses by increasing FPAUM in existing businesses and expanding into new investment strategies, geographic markets (including in both U.S. and
non-U.S.
markets) and businesses. For example, we recently completed both the Oak Street Acquisition, which focuses on structuring sale-leasebacks, including triple net leases, and the acquisition Wellfleet Credit Partners LLC, the performing credit arm of Littlejohn & Co., LLC which focuses on the management of CLO portfolios of broadly syndicated leveraged loans. Subject to the consent rights of Neuberger as set forth in the Investor Rights Agreement (as described below), we may pursue growth through acquisitions of other investment management companies, expansion into new markets, acquisitions of critical business partners or other strategic initiatives, in each case, which may include entering into new lines of business.
Attempts to expand our businesses involve a number of special risks, including some or all of the following:
 
   
the required investment of capital and other resources;
 
   
the diversion of management’s attention from our core businesses;
 
   
the assumption of liabilities in any acquired business;
 
   
the disruption of our ongoing businesses;
 
   
entry into markets or lines of business in which we may have limited or no experience, and which may subject us to new laws and regulations which we are not familiar or from which we are currently exempt;
 
   
increasing demands on our operational and management systems and controls;
 
   
compliance with or applicability to our businesses or our funds’ portfolio companies of regulations and laws, including, in particular, local regulations and laws (for example, consumer protection related laws) and the impact that noncompliance or even perceived noncompliance could have on us and our funds’ portfolio companies;
 
   
conflicts between business lines in deal flow or objectives;
 
   
we may be dependent upon, and subject to liability, losses or reputational damage relating to, systems, controls and personnel that are not under our control;
 
   
potential increase in fund investor concentration; and
 
   
the broadening of our geographic footprint, increasing the risks associated with conducting operations in foreign jurisdictions where we currently have little or no presence, such as different legal, tax and regulatory regimes and currency fluctuations, which require additional resources to address.
 
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Because we have not yet identified these potential new investment strategies, geographic markets or lines of business, we cannot identify all of the specific risks we may face and the potential adverse consequences on us and their investment that may result from any attempted expansion.
Rapid growth of our businesses may be difficult to sustain and may place significant demands on our administrative, operational and financial resources.
Our AUM has grown significantly in the past, and we intend to pursue further growth in the near future, including through acquisitions. Our rapid growth has placed, and future growth, if successful, will continue to place, significant demands on our legal, compliance, accounting and operational infrastructure and will result in increased expenses. In addition, we are, and will continue to be, required to continuously develop our systems and infrastructure in response to the increasing sophistication of the investment management market; legal, accounting, regulatory and tax developments and continually evolving cybersecurity risks.
Our future growth will depend in part on our ability to maintain an operating platform and management system sufficient to address our growth and may require us to incur significant additional expenses and to commit additional senior management and operational resources. As a result, we may face significant challenges in:
 
   
maintaining adequate financial, regulatory (legal, tax and compliance) and business controls;
 
   
providing current and future fund investors and stockholders with accurate and consistent reporting;
 
   
implementing new or updated information and financial systems and procedures; and
 
   
training, managing and appropriately sizing our work force and other components of our businesses on a timely and cost-effective basis.
We may not be able to manage our expanding operations effectively and may not be ready to continue to grow because of operational needs, and any failure to do so could adversely affect our ability to generate revenue and control our expenses. In addition, if we are unable to consummate or successfully integrate development opportunities, acquisitions or joint ventures, we may not be able to implement our growth strategy successfully.
Our Professional Sports Minority Investments strategy is new, subject to significant risk and uncertainty.
We have established and are continuing to build a new relationship with the NBA in furtherance of our Professional Sports Minority Investments strategy. Our Dyal HomeCourt Fund makes minority investments in NBA franchises. The NBA provides certain services with respect to the Dyal HomeCourt Fund and receives a share of management fees and incentive allocations attributable to the fund. There is no assurance that we will be able to raise sufficient funds to continue to execute this strategy in the future. As advisor to the Dyal HomeCourt Fund, we may be exposed to liability to the NBA in a range of circumstances including as a result of a violation of rules applicable to NBA franchise owners by us or investors in our Dyal HomeCourt Fund or, in certain circumstances, by our
co-owners
of a team (regardless of whether such persons were acting under our direction or control), the departure of certain Dyal Capital key persons or the occurrence of certain events constituting cause. Any failure of the Professional Sports Minority Investments strategy could result in a decrease in our FPAUM growth potential and have an adverse effect on our reputation. In addition, we associate from time to time with different businesses and managers in different ways. This may include Partner Managers, Dyal Home Court, and our seeding business through Oak Street. To differing degrees, these present the potential for a reputational risk that may have consequences that exceed the current materiality of the revenue from these businesses.
We depend on our senior management team, senior investment professionals and other key personnel, and the loss of their services would have a material adverse effect on us and our products.
Our success depends on the efforts, judgment and personal reputations of our senior management team, senior investment professionals and other key personnel. Their reputations, expertise in investing, relationships
 
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with fund investors and with other members of the business communities on whom we and our products depend on for investment opportunities and financing are each critical elements in operating and expanding our business. The loss of the services of our senior management team, senior investment professionals or other key personnel could have a material adverse effect on us and our products, and on the performance of our products, including on our ability to retain and attract fund investors and raise capital.
The departure of some or all of those individuals could also trigger certain provisions tied to the departure of, or cessation of committed time, by those persons (known as “key person” provisions) in the documentation governing certain of our products, which could permit the investors in those funds to suspend or terminate those funds’ investment periods. We do not carry any “key person” insurance that would provide us with proceeds in the event of the death or disability of any of our senior professionals, and we do not have a policy that prohibits our senior professionals from traveling together.
In addition, each of our Key Individuals is entitled to significant compensation payments and under certain circumstances (including the Key Individual’s death or disability), the Key Individual (or his estate) is entitled to retain those payments for up to five years following such person’s ceasing to be employed by us. While we continue to make such payments, we may need to find or promote new employees to replace the former Key Individual, which may require additional significant compensation to be paid by us, which could adversely affect our earnings.
Employee misconduct could harm us by impairing our ability to attract and retain fund investors and subjecting us to significant legal liability, regulatory scrutiny and reputational harm.
Our ability to attract and retain fund investors and to pursue investment opportunities for our clients depends heavily upon the reputation of our professionals, especially our senior professionals as well as third-party service providers. We are subject to a number of obligations and standards arising from our investment management business and our authority and statutory fiduciary status over the assets managed by our investment management business. Further, our employees are subject to various internal policies including a Code of Ethics and policies covering conflicts of interest, information systems, business continuity and information security. The violation of those obligations, standards and policies by any of our employees or misconduct by one of our third-party service providers could adversely affect investors in our products and us. Our businesses often require that we deal with confidential matters of great significance to companies in which our products may invest. If our employees, former employees or third-party service providers were to use or disclose confidential information improperly, we could suffer serious harm to our reputation, financial position and current and future business relationships. Employee or third-party service provider misconduct could also include, among other things, binding us to transactions that exceed authorized limits or present unacceptable risks and other unauthorized activities or concealing unsuccessful investments (which, in either case, may result in unknown and unmanaged risks or losses), or otherwise charging (or seeking to charge) inappropriate expenses or inappropriate or unlawful behavior or actions directed towards other employees.
It is not always possible to detect or deter misconduct by employees or third-party service providers, and the extensive precautions we take to detect and prevent this activity may not be effective in all cases. If one or more of our employees, former employees or third-party service providers were to engage in misconduct or were to be accused of such misconduct, our businesses and our reputation could be adversely affected and a loss of fund investor confidence could result, which would adversely impact our ability to raise future funds. Our current and former employees and those of our products’ investments as well as our third-party service providers may also become subject to allegations of sexual harassment, racial and gender discrimination or other similar misconduct, which, regardless of the ultimate outcome, may result in adverse publicity that could harm our and such portfolio company’s brand and reputation.
 
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Our future growth depends on our ability to attract, retain and develop human capital in a highly competitive talent market.
The success of our business will continue to depend upon us attracting, developing and retaining human capital. Competition for qualified, motivated, and highly-skilled executives, professionals and other key personnel in asset management firms is significant. Turnover and associated costs of rehiring, the loss of human capital through attrition, death, or disability and the reduced ability to attract talent could impair our ability to implement our growth strategy and maintain our standards of excellence. Our future success will depend upon our ability to find, attract, retain and motivate highly-skilled and highly-qualified individuals. We seek to provide our personnel with competitive benefits and compensation packages. However, our efforts may not be sufficient to enable us to attract, retain and motivate qualified individuals to support our growth. Moreover, if our personnel join competitors or form businesses that compete with ours, that could adversely affect our ability to raise new or successor funds.
We are subject to risks related to corporate social responsibility.
We and our products face increasing public scrutiny related to environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) activities, including diversity and inclusion, environmental stewardship, support for local communities, corporate governance and transparency. Before making an investment on behalf of our products, we analyze a wide array of considerations, risks, and potential rewards related to the prospective investment. Among the pecuniary considerations we analyze are the present and future material ESG implications of investments. It is expected that investor demands and the prevailing legal environment will require us to spend additional resources and place increasing importance on ESG matters in our review of prospective investments and management of existing ones. Devoting additional resources to ESG matters could increase the amount of expenses we or our investments are required to bear. Further, emphasis on ESG criteria in evaluating an investment by us or our products could lead to reduced profits.
ESG matters have been the subject of increased focus by certain regulators, including in the United States and the European Union. A lack of harmonization globally in relation to ESG legal and regulatory reform leads to a risk of fragmentation in group level priorities as a result of the different pace of sustainability transition across global jurisdictions. This may create conflicts across our global business and funds in which we invest which could risk inhibiting our future implementation of, and compliance with, rapidly developing ESG standards and requirements.
The European Commission has adopted legislative reforms, which include, without limitation: (a) Regulation 2019/2088 regarding the introduction of transparency and disclosure obligations for fund investors, funds and asset managers in relation to ESG factors, for which most rules took effect beginning on March 10, 2021; (b) a regulation regarding the introduction of an
EU-wide
taxonomy of environmentally sustainable activities, which takes effect in part in January 2022 and in part in January 2023; and (c) amendments to existing regulations including MiFID II and the European Union (“EU”) Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive (the “AIFMD”) to embed ESG requirements.
As a result of these legislative and regulatory initiatives, we may be required to provide additional disclosure to investors in our products with respect to ESG matters. This exposes us to increased disclosure risks, for example due to a lack of available or credible data, and the potential for conflicting disclosures may also expose us to an increased risk of misstatement litigation or miss-selling allegations. Failure to manage these risks could result in a material adverse effect on our business in a number of ways.
The effect of global climate change may impact the operations of our products’ investments.
There is evidence of global climate change. Climate change creates physical and financial risk and some of our products and their investments may be adversely affected by climate change. For example, the needs of
 
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customers of energy companies vary with weather conditions, primarily temperature and humidity. To the extent weather conditions are affected by climate change, energy use could increase or decrease depending on the duration and magnitude of any changes. Increases in the cost of energy could adversely affect the cost of operations of our investments if the use of energy products or services is material to their business. A decrease in energy use due to weather changes may affect some of our investments’ financial condition through, for example, decreased revenues. Extreme weather conditions in general require more system backup, adding to costs, and can contribute to increased system stresses, including service interruptions.
We are subject to risks in using custodians, counterparties, administrators and other agents.
Many of our products depend on the services of custodians, counterparties, administrators and other agents to carry out certain transactions and other administrative services, including compliance with regulatory requirements in U.S. and
non-U.S.
jurisdictions. We are subject to risks of errors and mistakes made by these third parties, which may be attributed to us and subject us or our products’ investors to reputational damage, penalties or losses. We depend on third parties to provide primary and back up communications and information systems. Any failure or interruption of those systems, including as a result of the termination of an agreement with any third-party service providers, could cause delays or other problems in our activities. Our financial, accounting, data processing, portfolio monitoring, backup or other operating systems and facilities may fail to operate properly or become disabled or damaged as a result of a number of factors including events that are wholly or partially beyond our control.
The terms of the contracts with third-party service providers are often customized and complex, and many of these arrangements occur in markets or relate to products that are not subject to regulatory oversight. Accordingly, we may be unsuccessful in seeking reimbursement or indemnification from these third-party service providers. In addition, we rely on a select number of third-party services providers and replacement of any one of our service providers could be difficult and result in disruption and expense.
Cybersecurity risks and cyber incidents could adversely affect our business by causing a disruption to our operations, a compromise or corruption of our confidential information and confidential information in our possession and damage to our business relationships, any of which could negatively impact our business, financial condition and operating results.
There has been an increase in the frequency and sophistication of the cyber and security threats we face, with attacks ranging from those common to businesses generally to those that are more advanced and persistent, which may target us because, as an alternative asset management firm, we hold confidential and other price sensitive information about existing and potential investments. Cyber-attacks and other security threats could originate from a wide variety of sources, including cyber criminals, nation state hackers, hacktivists and other outside parties. As a result, we may face a heightened risk of a security breach or disruption with respect to sensitive information resulting from an attack by computer hackers, foreign governments or cyber terrorists.
The efficient operation of our business is dependent on computer hardware and software systems, as well as data processing systems and the secure processing, storage and transmission of information, which are vulnerable to security breaches and cyber incidents. A cyber incident is considered to be any adverse event that threatens the confidentiality, integrity or availability of our information resources. These incidents may be an intentional attack or an unintentional event and could involve gaining unauthorized access to our information systems for purposes of misappropriating assets, stealing confidential information, corrupting data or causing operational disruption. In addition, we and our employees may be the target of fraudulent emails or other targeted attempts to gain unauthorized access to proprietary or sensitive information. The result of these incidents may include disrupted operations, misstated or unreliable financial data, fraudulent transfers or requests for transfers of money, liability for stolen assets or information, increased cybersecurity protection and insurance costs, litigation and damage to our business relationships, causing our business and results of operations to suffer. As our reliance on technology has increased, so have the risks posed to our information systems, both internal and those provided by third-party
 
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service providers. We have implemented processes, procedures and internal controls designed to mitigate cybersecurity risks and cyber intrusions and rely on industry accepted securities measures and technology to securely maintain confidential and proprietary information maintained on our information systems; however, these measures, as well as our increased awareness of the nature and extent of a risk of a cyber-incident, do not guarantee that a cyber-incident will not occur and/or that our financial results, operations or confidential information will not be negatively impacted by such an incident, especially because the cyber-incident techniques change frequently or are not recognized until launched and because cyber-incidents can originate from a wide variety of sources.
Those risks are exacerbated by the rapidly increasing volume of highly sensitive data, including our proprietary business information and intellectual property, and personally identifiable information of our employees, our clients and others, that we collect and store in our data centers and on our networks. Our products may also invest in strategic assets having a national or regional profile or in infrastructure assets, the nature of which could expose them to a greater risk of being subject to a terrorist attack or security breach than other assets or businesses. The secure processing, maintenance and transmission of this information are critical to our operations. A significant actual or potential theft, loss, corruption, exposure, fraudulent use or misuse of fund investor, employee or other personally identifiable or proprietary business data, whether by third parties or as a result of employee malfeasance (or the negligence or malfeasance of third party service providers that have access to such confidential information) or otherwise,
non-compliance
with our contractual or other legal obligations regarding such data or intellectual property or a violation of our privacy and security policies with respect to such data could result in significant remediation and other costs, fines, litigation or regulatory actions against us and significant reputational harm.
Increased data protection regulation may result in increased complexities and risk in connection with the operation of our business and our products.
We operate in businesses that are highly dependent on information systems and technology. The costs related to cyber or other security threats or disruptions may not be fully insured or indemnified by other means. Cybersecurity has become a priority for regulators in the U.S. and around the world. Many jurisdictions in which we operate have laws and regulations relating to data privacy, cybersecurity and protection of personal information, including the California Consumer Privacy Act that went into effect on January 1, 2020, and the New York SHIELD Act, which went into effect on March 1, 2020. In addition, one of the 2019 examination priorities for the SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations was to continue to examine cybersecurity procedures and controls, including testing the implementation of these procedures and controls. Further, the European General Data Protection Regulation (the “GDPR”) came into effect in May 2018. Data protection requirements under the GDPR are more stringent than those imposed under prior European legislation. There are substantial financial penalties for breach of the GDPR, including up to the higher of 20 million Euros or 4% of group annual worldwide turnover.
Non-compliance
with any of the aforementioned laws or other similar laws, therefore, represents a serious risk to our business. Some jurisdictions have also enacted laws requiring companies to notify individuals of data security breaches involving certain types of personal data. Breaches in security could potentially jeopardize our, our employees’ or our product investors’ or counterparties’ confidential and other information processed and stored in, and transmitted through, our computer systems and networks, or otherwise cause interruptions or malfunctions in our, our employees’, our product investors’, our counterparties’ or third parties’ operations, which could result in significant losses, increased costs, disruption of our business, liability to our product investors and other counterparties, regulatory intervention or reputational damage. Furthermore, if we fail to comply with the relevant laws and regulations, it could result in regulatory investigations and penalties, which could lead to negative publicity and may cause our product investors and clients to lose confidence in the effectiveness of our security measures.
 
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We are subject to litigation risks, and consequently, we may face liabilities and damage to our professional reputation as a result.
Legal liability could have a material adverse effect on our businesses, financial condition or results of operations or cause reputational harm to us, which could harm our businesses. We depend to a large extent on our business relationships and our reputation for integrity and high-caliber professional services to attract and retain fund investors and to pursue investment opportunities for our products. As a result, allegations of improper conduct asserted by private litigants or regulators, regardless of whether the ultimate outcome is favorable or unfavorable to us, as well as negative publicity and press speculation about us, our investment activities or the investment industry in general, whether or not valid, may harm our reputation, which may be damaging to our businesses.
In addition, the laws and regulations governing the limited liability of such issuers and investments vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, and in certain contexts the laws of certain jurisdictions may provide not only for carve-outs from limited liability protection for the issuer or portfolio company that has incurred the liabilities, but also for recourse to assets of other entities under common control with, or that are part of the same economic group as, such issuer. For example, if any of our products’ investments is subject to bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings in a jurisdiction and is found to have liabilities under the local consumer protection, labor, tax or bankruptcy laws, the laws of that jurisdiction may permit authorities or creditors to file a lien on, or to otherwise have recourse to, assets held by other investments (including assets held by our products) in that jurisdiction. There can be no assurance that we will not be adversely affected as a result of the foregoing risks.
We may not be able to maintain sufficient insurance to cover us for potential litigation or other risks.
We may not be able to maintain sufficient insurance on commercially reasonable terms or with adequate coverage levels against potential liabilities we may face in connection with potential claims, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. We may face a risk of loss from a variety of claims, including related to securities, antitrust, contracts, cybersecurity, fraud and various other potential claims, whether or not such claims are valid. Insurance and other safeguards might only partially reimburse us for our losses, if at all, and if a claim is successful and exceeds or is not covered by our insurance policies, we may be required to pay a substantial amount in respect of such successful claim. Certain losses of a catastrophic nature, such as losses arising as a result of wars, earthquakes, typhoons, terrorist attacks or other similar events, may be uninsurable or may only be insurable at rates that are so high that maintaining coverage would cause an adverse impact on our business, our investment funds and their investments. In general, losses related to terrorism are becoming harder and more expensive to insure against. Some insurers are excluding terrorism coverage from their
all-risk
policies. In some cases, insurers are offering significantly limited coverage against terrorist acts for additional premiums, which can greatly increase the total cost of casualty insurance for a property. As a result, we, our products and their investments may not be insured against terrorism or certain other catastrophic losses.
Our use of leverage to finance our businesses exposes us to substantial risks. Any security interests or negative covenants required by a credit facility we enter into may limit our ability to create liens on assets to secure additional debt.
We may choose to finance our businesses operations through the issuance of senior notes, borrowings under our Revolving Credit Facility or by issuing additional debt in the future. Our existing and future indebtedness exposes us to the typical risks associated with the use of leverage. The occurrence or continuation of any of these events or trends could cause us to suffer a decline in the credit ratings assigned to our debt by rating agencies, which could cause the interest rate applicable to borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facility to increase and could result in other material adverse effects on our businesses. We depend on financial institutions extending credit to us on terms that are reasonable to us. There is no guarantee that such institutions will continue to extend credit to us or renew any existing credit agreements we may have with them, or that we will be able to refinance outstanding facilities when they mature. In addition, the incurrence of additional debt in the future could result in
 
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potential downgrades of our existing corporate credit ratings, which could limit the availability of future financing and increase our cost of borrowing. Furthermore, our Revolving Credit Facility contains certain covenants with which we need to comply.
Non-compliance
with any of the covenants without cure or waiver would constitute an event of default, and an event of default resulting from a breach of certain covenants could result, at the option of the lenders, in an acceleration of the principal and interest outstanding. In addition, if we incur additional debt, our credit rating could be adversely impacted.
Blue Owl may provide financial guarantees of performance in connection with certain investments, particularly in the Real Estate product-line, to certain lenders to its products and investments. Lenders in commercial real estate financing customarily will require such guarantees, which typically provides that the lender can recover losses from the guarantors for certain bad acts, such as fraud or intentional misrepresentation, intentional waste, willful misconduct, criminal acts, misappropriation of funds, voluntary incurrence of prohibited debt and environmental losses sustained by lender. It is expected that commercial real estate financing arrangements will generally require such guarantees and in the event that such a guarantee is called, Blue Owl’s assets could be materially and adversely affected.
As borrowings under our senior notes, Revolving Credit Facility and any future indebtedness mature, we may be required to either refinance them by entering into new facilities or issuing additional debt, which could result in higher borrowing costs, or issuing equity, which would dilute existing stockholders. We could also repay these borrowings by using cash on hand, cash provided by our continuing operations or cash from the sale of our assets. We may be unable to enter into new facilities or issue debt or equity in the future on attractive terms, or at all. Borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facility are SOFR-based obligations. As a result, an increase in short-term interest rates will increase our interest costs if such borrowings are not been hedged into fixed rates in the future.
Risks Related to Legal and Regulatory Environment
Our businesses are subject to extensive domestic and foreign regulations that may subject us to significant costs and compliance requirements, and our failure to comply with such regulations could have a material adverse effect on our business.
Our businesses, as well as the financial services industry, generally are subject to extensive regulation, including periodic examinations, by governmental agencies and self-regulatory organizations or exchanges in the U.S. and foreign jurisdictions in which we operate relating to, among other things, securities, antitrust, anti-money laundering, anti-bribery, tax and privacy. Each of the regulatory bodies with jurisdiction over us has regulatory powers dealing with many aspects of financial services, including the authority to grant, and in specific circumstances to cancel, permissions to carry on particular activities. The financial services industry may face an increasingly difficult political and regulatory environment, especially as a result of the recent change in presidential administration. The current administration has expressed support for proposals that call for greater regulatory oversight of the financial services industry. If these proposals were to become policy, such developments, including investors’ perceptions of and responses to such proposals, could potentially have a material adverse effect on our business, our products and the businesses of the companies in which our products invest.
We recently expanded our business to Canada, the U.K., Hong Kong and Singapore. Differences between the laws and rules governing our businesses in these jurisdictions compared to the United States result in inconsistent regulatory requirements that it may not be possible to fully reconcile in a cost-efficient manner across our businesses.
The SEC oversees the activities of certain of our subsidiaries that are registered investment advisers under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (the “Advisers Act”) and the activities of our BDCs that are regulated under the Investment Company Act.
 
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Investment Advisers Act of 1940:
The Advisers Act imposes specific restrictions on an investment adviser’s ability to engage in principal and agency cross transactions. Our registered investment advisers are subject to additional requirements that cover, among other things, disclosure of information about our business to clients; maintenance of written policies and procedures; maintenance of extensive books and records; restrictions on the types of fees we may charge, including performance fees and carried interest; solicitation arrangements; maintaining effective compliance programs; custody of client assets; client privacy; advertising; and proxy voting. Failure to comply with the obligations imposed by the Advisers Act could result in investigations, sanctions, fines, restrictions on the activities of us or our personnel and reputational damage.
Under the Advisers Act, an investment adviser (whether or not registered under the Advisers Act) has fiduciary duties to its clients. The SEC has interpreted those duties to impose standards, requirements and limitations on, among other things, trading for proprietary, personal and client accounts; allocations of investment opportunities among clients; execution of transactions; and recommendations to clients.
Investment Company Act:
Our subsidiaries are the advisers to our BDCs, which are subject to the rules and regulations under the Investment Company Act. Our BDCs are required to file periodic and annual reports with the SEC and may also be required to comply with the applicable provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Furthermore, advisers to our BDCs have a fiduciary duty under the Investment Company Act not to charge excessive compensation, and the Investment Company Act grants stockholders of mutual funds and BDCs a direct private right of action against investment advisers to seek redress for alleged violations of this fiduciary duty.
While we exercise broad discretion over the
day-to-day
management of our BDCs, each of our BDCs is also subject to oversight and management by a board of directors, a majority of whom are not “interested persons” as defined under the Investment Company Act. The responsibilities of each of our BDC’s boards include, among other things, approving our advisory contract with the applicable BDC that we manage; approving certain service providers; determining the valuation and the method for valuing assets; and monitoring transactions involving affiliates; and approving certain
co-investment
transactions. The advisory contracts with each of our BDCs may be terminated by the stockholders or directors of such BDC on not more than 60 days’ notice, and are subject to annual renewal by each respective BDC’s board of directors after an initial
two-year
term.
Our BDCs are also prohibited from knowingly participating in certain transactions with their affiliates, except as permitted by the Investment Company Act and the
Co-investment
Exemptive Order. For additional details, see
“Conflicts of interest may arise in connection with
co-investments
between our private funds and our BDCs”
.
In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act authorizes federal regulatory agencies to review and, in certain cases, prohibit compensation arrangements at financial institutions that give employees incentives to engage in conduct deemed to encourage inappropriate risk-taking by covered financial institutions. In 2016, federal bank regulatory authorities and the SEC revised and
re-proposed
a rule that generally (1) prohibits incentive-based payment arrangements that are determined to encourage inappropriate risks by certain financial institutions by providing excessive compensation or that could lead to material financial loss and (2) requires those financial institutions to disclose information concerning incentive-based compensation arrangements to the appropriate federal regulator. The Dodd-Frank Act also directs the SEC to adopt a rule that requires public companies to adopt and disclose policies requiring, in the event the company is required to issue an accounting restatement, the contingent repayment of obligations of related incentive compensation from current and former executive officers. The SEC has proposed but not yet adopted such rule. To the extent the aforementioned rules are adopted, our ability to recruit and retain investment professionals and senior management executives could be limited.
Other Securities Laws:
In addition, we regularly rely on exemptions from various requirements of the Securities Act, the Exchange Act, and the Commodity Exchange Act. Those exemptions are sometimes highly complex and may in certain circumstances depend on compliance by third parties whom we do not control. The revocation, challenge or unavailability of these exemptions could increase our cost of doing business or subject
 
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us to regulatory action or third-party claims, which could have a material adverse effect on our businesses. For example, Rule 506 of Regulation D under the Securities Act includes “bad actor” disqualification provisions that ban an issuer from offering or selling securities pursuant to the safe harbor in Rule 506 if the issuer, or any other “covered person,” is the subject of a criminal, regulatory or court order or other “disqualifying event” under the rule which has not been waived by the SEC. The definition of a “covered person” under the rule includes an issuer’s directors, general partners, managing members and executive officers and promoters and persons compensated for soliciting investors in the offering. Accordingly, our ability to rely on Rule 506 to offer or sell our products and therefore a significant portion of our business would be impaired if we or any “covered person” is the subject of a disqualifying event under the rule and we are unable to obtain a waiver or, in certain circumstances, terminate our involvement with such “covered person”.
Compliance with existing and new regulations subjects us to significant costs. Any changes or other developments in the regulatory framework applicable to our businesses and changes to formerly accepted industry practices, may impose additional costs on us, require the attention of our senior management or limit the manner in which we conduct our businesses. We may be adversely affected by changes in the interpretation or enforcement of existing laws and rules by these governmental authorities and self-regulatory organizations. Additional legislation, increasing global regulatory oversight of fundraising activities, changes in rules promulgated by self-regulatory organizations or exchanges or changes in the interpretation or enforcement of existing laws and rules, either in the United States or elsewhere, may directly affect our mode of operation and profitability. Moreover, our failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations, including labor and employment laws, could result in fines, censure, suspensions of personnel or other sanctions, including revocation of the registration of our relevant subsidiaries as investment advisers or our broker-dealer affiliate as a registered broker-dealer.
Even if a sanction is imposed against us, one of our subsidiaries or our affiliates or our personnel by a regulator for a small monetary amount, the costs incurred in responding to such matters could be material. The adverse publicity related to the sanction could harm our reputation, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our businesses, making it harder for us to raise new and successor funds and discouraging others from doing business with us or accepting investments from our products.
Heightened scrutiny of the financial services industry by regulators may materially and adversely affect our business.
The financial services industry has been the subject of heightened scrutiny by regulators around the globe. In particular, the SEC and its staff have focused more narrowly on issues relevant to alternative asset management firms, including by forming specialized units devoted to examining such firms and, in certain cases, bringing enforcement actions against the firms, their Principals and employees. In recent periods there have been a number of enforcement actions within the industry, and it is expected that the SEC will continue to pursue enforcement actions against asset managers. This increased enforcement activity has caused, and could further cause us to reevaluate certain practices and adjust our compliance control function as necessary and appropriate.
While the SEC’s recent lists of examination priorities include such items as cybersecurity compliance and controls and conducting risk-based examinations of investment advisory firms, it is generally expected that the SEC’s oversight of alternative asset managers will continue to focus substantially on concerns related to fiduciary duty transparency and investor disclosure practices (See “—
Conflicts of interest may arise in our allocation of capital and
co-investment
opportunities
”). Although the SEC has cited improvements in disclosures and industry practices in this area, it has also indicated that there is room for improvement in particular areas, including fees and expenses (and the allocation of such fees and expenses) and
co-investment
practices. To this end, many firms have received inquiries during examinations or directly from the SEC’s Division of Enforcement regarding various transparency-related topics, including the acceleration of monitoring fees, the allocation of broken-deal expenses, outside business activities of firm Principals and employees, group purchasing arrangements and general conflicts of interest disclosures. While we believe we have made appropriate and timely disclosures regarding the foregoing, the SEC staff may disagree.
 
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Further, the SEC has highlighted BDC board oversight and valuation practices as one of its areas of focus in investment adviser examinations and has instituted enforcement actions against advisers for misleading investors about valuation. If the SEC were to investigate and find errors in our methodologies or procedures, we and/or members of our board and management could be subject to penalties and fines, which could harm our reputation and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.
Regulations governing the operations of our BDCs as business development companies affect their ability to raise, and the way in which they raise, additional capital.
Our BDCs have elected to be regulated as business development companies under the Investment Company Act. Many of the regulations governing business development companies restrict, among other things, leverage incurrence,
co-investments
and other transactions with other entities within Blue Owl. Certain of our products may be restricted from engaging in transactions with our BDCs and their subsidiaries. As business development companies regulated under the Investment Company Act, our BDCs may issue debt securities or preferred stock and borrow money from banks or other financial institutions, which we refer to collectively as “senior securities,” up to the maximum amount permitted by the Investment Company Act.
BDCs are not generally able to issue and sell their common stock at a price below net asset value per share. BDCs may, however, issue and sell their common stock, or warrants, options or rights to acquire such common stock, at a price below the then-current net asset value of such common stock if (1) the applicable BDC’s board of directors determines that such sale is in the BDC’s best interests and the best interests of the BDC’s stockholders, and (2) the applicable BDC’s stockholders have approved a policy and practice of making such sales within the preceding
12-months.
In any such case, the price at which the securities of BDCs are to be issued and sold may not be less than a price which, in the determination of the applicable board of directors, closely approximates the market value of such securities.
In addition, as business development companies that are subject to regulations under the Investment Company Act, our BDCs are currently permitted to incur indebtedness or issue senior securities only in amounts such that their asset coverage ratio equals at least 150% after each such issuance, except in the instance of ORCC II, which is required to maintain an asset coverage ratio of at least 200%. Our BDCs’ ability to pay dividends will be restricted if such BDC’s asset coverage ratio falls below the required asset coverage ratio and any amounts that it uses to service its indebtedness are not available for dividends to its common stockholders. Any of the foregoing circumstances could have a material adverse effect on our BDCs, and as a result, on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flow.
For U.S. federal income tax purposes, our BDCs have elected to be treated as regulated investment companies (“RICs”) under Subchapter M of the Code. To maintain their status as RICs, our BDCs must meet, among other things, certain source of income, asset diversification and annual distribution requirements. Each of our BDCs is required to generally distribute to its stockholders at least 90% of such BDC’s investment company taxable income to maintain its RIC status.
Changes to the method of determining the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) or the selection of a replacement for LIBOR may affect the value of investments held by our products and could affect our results of operations and financial results.
LIBOR, the London Interbank Offered Rate, is the basic rate of interest used in lending transactions between banks on the London interbank market and is widely used as a reference for setting the interest rate on loans globally. Our products, and in particular our BDCs, typically use LIBOR as a reference rate in term loans they extend to investments such that the interest due to us pursuant to a term loan extended to a portfolio company is calculated using LIBOR. The terms of our debt investments generally include minimum interest rate floors which are calculated based on LIBOR.
 
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The United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority (the “FCA”), which regulates LIBOR, announced that it will not compel panel banks to contribute to LIBOR after 2021. In addition, in March 2021, the FCA announced that LIBOR will no longer be provided for the
one-week
and
two-month
U.S. dollar settings after December 21, 2021 and that publication of the U.S. dollar settings for the overnight,
one-month,
three-month,
six-month
and
12-month
LIBOR rates will cease after June 30, 2023. It is unclear if at that time LIBOR will cease to exist or if new methods of calculating LIBOR will be established such that it continues to exist after 2023. The discontinuance of LIBOR, as well as uncertainty related to the establishment of any alternative reference rate, may adversely affect our cost of capital and the market for LIBOR-based securities, which could have an adverse impact on the earnings from or value of our investment portfolio.
Central banks and regulators in a number of major jurisdictions (for example, United States, United Kingdom, European Union, Switzerland and Japan) have convened working groups to find, and implement the transition to, suitable replacements for interbank offered rates (“IBORs”). To identify a successor rate for U.S. dollar LIBOR, the Alternative Reference Rates Committee (“ARRC”), a U.S.-based group convened by the Federal Reserve Board and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, was formed. The ARRC has recommended the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”) plus a recommended spread adjustment as its preferred alternative rate for LIBOR. SOFR is a measure of the cost of borrowing cash overnight, collateralized by U.S. Treasury securities, and is based on directly observable U.S. Treasury-backed repurchase transactions. However, given that SOFR is a secured rate backed by government securities, it will be a rate that does not take into account bank credit risk (as is the case with LIBOR). SOFR is therefore likely to be lower than LIBOR and is less likely to correlate with the funding costs of financial institutions. Although SOFR plus the recommended spread adjustment appears to be the preferred replacement rate for U.S. dollar LIBOR, and its use continues to steadily grow, at this time it is not possible to predict the effect of any such changes, any establishment of alternative reference rates or other reforms to LIBOR that may be enacted in the United States, United Kingdom or elsewhere.
As such, if LIBOR in its current form does not survive and a replacement rate is not widely agreed upon or if a replacement rate is significantly different from LIBOR, it could cause a disruption in the credit markets generally. The elimination of LIBOR or any other changes or reforms to the determination or supervision of LIBOR could have an adverse impact on the market for or value of any LIBOR-linked securities, loans, and other financial obligations or extensions of credit held by or due to our investments or on our overall financial condition or results of operations. In addition, if LIBOR ceases to exist, our products, borrowers of our products and our Partner Managers and their respective portfolio companies may need to renegotiate the credit agreements extending beyond 2023 that utilize LIBOR as a factor in determining the interest rate, in order to replace LIBOR with the new standard that is established, which may have an adverse effect on our overall financial condition or results of operations. Following the replacement of LIBOR, some or all of these credit agreements may bear interest at a lower interest rate, which, to the extent our products are lenders, could have an adverse impact on their performance, could have an adverse impact on our products’ and their portfolio companies’ results of operations. Moreover, if LIBOR ceases to exist, our products and their portfolio companies may need to renegotiate certain terms of their credit facilities. If our products and their portfolio companies are unable to do so, amounts drawn under their credit facilities may bear interest at a higher rate, which would increase the cost of their borrowings and, in turn, affect their results of operations.
Failure to comply with “pay to play” regulations implemented by the SEC and certain states, and changes to the “pay to play” regulatory regimes, could adversely affect our businesses.
Since 2010, states and other regulatory authorities have begun to require investment managers to register as lobbyists. We are registered as a lobbyist in California. These registration requirements impose significant compliance obligations on registered lobbyists and their employers, which may include annual registration fees, periodic disclosure reports and internal record keeping, and may also prohibit the payment of contingent fees.
Under applicable SEC rules, investment advisers are required to implement compliance policies designed, among other matters, to track contributions by certain of the adviser’s employees and engagements of third
 
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parties that solicit government entities and to keep certain records to enable the SEC to determine compliance with the rule. In addition, there have been similar rules on a state level regarding “pay to play” practices by investment advisers. FINRA has its own set of “pay to play” regulations that are similar to the SEC’s regulations.
As we have public pension plans that are investors in our products, these rules could impose significant economic sanctions on our businesses if we or one of the other persons covered by the rules make any prohibited contribution or payment, whether or not material or with an intent to secure an investment from a public pension plan. We may also acquire other investment managers or hire additional personnel who are not subject to the same restrictions as us, but whose activity, and the activity of their Principals, prior to our ownership or employment of such person, could affect our product raising. Any failure on our part to comply with these rules could cause us to lose compensation for our advisory services or expose us to significant penalties and reputational damage.
Failure to comply with regulations regarding the prevention of money laundering or terrorism or national security could adversely affect our business.
As part of our responsibility for the prevention of money laundering under applicable laws, we may require detailed verification of a prospective investor’s identity and the source of such prospective investor’s funds. In the event of delay or failure by a prospective investor to produce any such information required for verification purposes, we may refuse to admit the investor to our products. We may from
time-to-time
request (outside of the subscription process), and our products’ limited partners will be obligated to provide to us as appropriate upon such request, additional information as from time to time may be required for us to satisfy our obligations under these and other laws that may be adopted in the future. Additionally, we may from time to time be obligated to file reports with regulatory authorities in various jurisdictions with regard to, among other things, the identity of our products’ limited partners and suspicious activities involving the interests of our products. In the event it is determined that any investor, or any direct or indirect owner of any investor, is a person identified in any of these laws as a prohibited person, or is otherwise engaged in activities of the type prohibited under these laws, we may be obligated, among other actions to be taken, to withhold distributions of any funds otherwise owing to such investor or to cause such investor’s interests to be cancelled or otherwise redeemed (without the payment of any consideration in respect of those interests).
The Bank Secrecy Act of 1970 and the USA PATRIOT Act require that financial institutions (a term that includes banks, broker-dealers and investment companies) establish and maintain compliance programs to guard against money laundering activities. Laws or regulations may presently or in the future require us, our products or any of our affiliates or other service providers to establish additional anti-money laundering procedures, to collect information with respect to our products’ limited partners, to share information with governmental authorities with respect to our products’ limited partners or to implement additional restrictions on the transfer of the interests. These requirements can lead to increased expenses and exposure to enforcement actions
Economic sanction laws in the U.S. and other jurisdictions may prohibit us and our affiliates from transacting with certain countries, individuals and companies, which could negatively impact our business, financial condition and operating results.
Economic sanction laws in the U.S. and other jurisdictions may restrict or prohibit us or our affiliates from transacting with certain countries, territories, individuals and entities. In the U.S., the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) administers and enforces laws, executive orders and regulations establishing U.S. economic and trade sanctions, which restrict or prohibit, among other things, direct and indirect transactions with, and the provision of services to, certain
non-U.S.
countries, territories, individuals and entities. These types of sanctions may significantly restrict or completely prohibit lending activities in certain jurisdictions, and violation of any such laws or regulations, may result in significant legal and monetary penalties, as well as reputational damage. OFAC sanctions programs change frequently, which may make it more difficult for us or our affiliates to ensure compliance. Moreover, OFAC enforcement is increasing, which may
 
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increase the risk that we become subject of such actual or threatened enforcement. In addition, any sanctions imposed in connection with the escalation of hostilities between Russia and Ukraine may impact portfolio companies of our funds, which may in turn impact us.
Additionally, Section 2019 of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (the “ITRA”) amended the Exchange Act to require companies subject to SEC reporting obligations under Section 13 of the Exchange Act to disclose in their periodic reports specified dealings or transactions involving Iran or other individuals and entities targeted by OFAC during the period covered by the relevant periodic report. In some cases, the ITRA requires companies to disclose these types of transactions even if they were permissible under U.S. law. Companies that currently may be or may have been at the time considered our affiliates, may have from time to time publicly filed and/or provided to us such disclosures. We do not independently verify or participate in the preparation of these disclosures. We and our publicly traded funds are required, either periodically or annually to separately file with the SEC a notice when such activities have been disclosed, and the SEC is required to post such notice of disclosure on its website and send the report to the President and certain U.S. Congressional committees. Disclosure of such activity, even if such activity is not subject to sanctions under applicable law, and any sanctions actually imposed on us or our affiliates as a result of these activities, could harm our reputation and have a negative impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations, and any failure to disclose any such activities as required could additionally result in fines or penalties.
We are subject to laws and regulations in the EEA, including the Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive, which may increase our regulatory costs and burdens.
The AIFMD regulates the activities of certain private fund managers undertaking fund management activities or marketing fund interests to investors within the EEA.
To the extent any one of our products is actively marketed to investors domiciled or having their registered office in the EEA: (i) we and such fund will be subject to certain reporting, disclosure and other compliance obligations under the AIFMD, which will result in such funds incurring additional costs and expenses; (ii) we and such fund may become subject to additional regulatory or compliance obligations arising under national law in certain EEA jurisdictions, which would result in such fund incurring additional costs and expenses or may otherwise affect the management and operation of such fund; (iii) we will be required to make detailed information relating to such fund and its investments available to regulators and third parties; and (iv) the AIFMD will also restrict certain activities of such fund in relation to EEA investments, including, in some circumstances, such fund’s ability to recapitalize, refinance or potentially restructure an EEA portfolio company within the first two years of ownership, which may in turn affect operations of such fund generally. In addition, it is possible that some EEA jurisdictions will elect to restrict or prohibit the marketing of
non-EEA
funds to investors based in those jurisdictions, which may make it more difficult for our products to raise their targeted amount of commitments. We rely on a third party provider to ensure our compliance with these regulations, including required registrations, which may increase our compliance costs and risk of
non-compliance.
In the future, it may be possible for
non-EEA
alternative investment fund managers (“AIFMs”) to market an alternative investment fund (“AIF”) within the EEA pursuant to a
pan-European
marketing “passport”, instead of under national private placement regimes. Access to this passport may be subject to the
non-EEA
AIFM complying with various additional requirements under the AIFMD, which may include one or more of the following: additional conduct of business and organizational requirements; rules relating to the remuneration of certain personnel; minimum regulatory capital requirements; restrictions on the use of leverage; additional disclosure and reporting requirements to both investors and EEA home state regulators; independent valuation of an AIF’s assets; and the appointment of an independent depositary. Certain EEA Member States have indicated that they will cease to operate national private placement regimes when, or shortly after, the passport becomes available, which would mean that
non-EEA
AIFMs to whom the passport is available would be required to comply with all relevant provisions of the AIFMD in order to market to professional investors in those jurisdictions. As a result, if in the future
non-EEA
AIFMs may only market in certain EEA jurisdictions pursuant
 
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to a passport, we may not seek to market interests in our products in those jurisdictions, which may lead to a reduction in the overall amount of capital invested in our products. Alternatively, if we sought to comply with the requirements to use the passport, this could have adverse effects including, amongst other things, increasing the regulatory burden and costs of operating and managing certain of our products and their investments, and potentially requiring changes to compensation structures for key personnel, thereby affecting our ability to recruit and retain these personnel.
Certain of the funds or accounts we advise or manage are subject to the fiduciary responsibility and prohibited transaction provisions of ERISA and Section 4975 of the Code, and our businesses could be adversely affected if certain of our other funds or accounts fail to satisfy an exception under the “plan assets” regulation under ERISA.
A number of investors in our products are subject to the fiduciary and prohibited transaction provisions of Title I of ERISA and the parallel provisions of the Internal Revenue Code; however, the substantial majority of our products rely on the “insignificant participation” exception under the “plan assets” regulation under ERISA. We are not, therefore subject to the requirements of ERISA (or the parallel provision of the Internal Revenue Code) with respect to the management of those funds. However, if those funds fail to satisfy that exception for any reason and if no other exception is available, that failure could materially interfere with our activities in relation to those funds or expose us to risks related to our failure to comply with the applicable requirements. For example, the governing documents of a fund generally impose certain obligations on the general partner or manager of the fund to cause the assets of the fund to not be treated as “plan assets” and a breach of that obligation could create liability for us. Further, if the assets of a fund become plan assets (whether because of our breach, a change in law or otherwise), the application of ERISA-related requirements on our product may prevent us from operating the fund as intended and may cause the fund to breach its obligations with Partner Managers or other investments, which would create significant liabilities for our products and could significantly impact the fund’s ability to make any further investments. Further, we have formed a small number of holding vehicles to facilitate
co-investments
alongside our products by ERISA investors, the assets of which holding vehicles constitute “plan assets” and with respect to which we serve as a fiduciary. While we may be required to satisfy applicable fiduciary standards and avoid the prohibited transaction provisions of ERISA with respect to such holding vehicles and their assets, in each case, our authority with respect to the management and control of those vehicles is limited by contract with the relevant fund investor. Accordingly, we do not anticipate any liabilities with respect to our serving as a fiduciary with respect to such vehicles.
Risks Related to Our Products
The historical returns attributable to our products should not be considered as indicative of the future results of our products or of our future results or of any returns expected on an investment in our Class A Shares.
The historical performance of our products is relevant to us primarily insofar as it is indicative of performance income we have earned in the past and may earn in the future and our reputation and ability to raise new funds. The historical and potential returns of the funds we advise are not, however, directly linked to returns on shares of our Class A Shares. Therefore, holders of our Class A Shares should not conclude that positive performance of the funds we advise will necessarily result in positive returns on a return on investment in our Class A Shares. However, poor performance of our products we advise would likely cause a decline in our revenues and would therefore likely have a negative effect on our operating results, returns on our Class A Shares and a negative impact on our ability to raise new funds. Also, there is no assurance that projections in respect of our products or unrealized valuations will be realized.
Moreover, the historical returns of our products should not be considered indicative of the future returns of these or from any future funds we may raise, in part because:
 
   
market conditions during previous periods may have been significantly more favorable for generating positive performance than the market conditions we may experience in the future;
 
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our products’ rates of returns, which are calculated on the basis of net asset value of the funds’ investments, reflect unrealized gains, which may never be realized;
 
   
our products’ returns have previously benefited from investment opportunities and general market conditions that may not recur, including the availability of debt capital on attractive terms and the availability of distressed debt opportunities, and we may not be able to achieve the same returns or profitable investment opportunities or deploy capital as quickly;
 
   
the historical returns that we present in this prospectus derive largely from the performance of our earlier funds, whereas future fund returns will depend increasingly on the performance of our newer funds or funds not yet formed, which may have little or no realized investment track record;
 
   
our products’ historical investments were made over a long period of time and over the course of various market and macroeconomic cycles, and the circumstances under which our current or future funds may make future investments may differ significantly from those conditions prevailing in the past;
 
   
the attractive returns of certain of our products have been driven by the rapid return on invested capital, which has not occurred with respect to all of our products and we believe is less likely to occur in the future;
 
   
in recent years, there has been increased competition for investment opportunities resulting from the increased amount of capital invested in alternative funds and high liquidity in debt markets, and the increased competition for investments may reduce our returns in the future; and
 
   
our newly established funds may generate lower returns during the period that they take to deploy their capital.
The future internal rate of return for any current or future fund may vary considerably from the historical internal rate of return generated by any particular fund, or for our products as a whole. Future returns will also be affected by the risks described elsewhere in this proxy statement, including risks of the industries and businesses in which a particular fund invests.
Valuation methodologies for certain assets of our products can be subject to significant subjectivity.
Many of the investments in our products are illiquid and thus have no readily ascertainable market prices. We value these investments based on our estimate, or an independent third party’s estimate, of their value as of the date of determination. The determination of fair value, and thus the amount of unrealized appreciation or depreciation our products may recognize in any reporting period, is to a degree subjective. Our products generally value their investments quarterly at fair value, as determined in good faith by our products’ respective boards or a valuation committee, as applicable, based on, among other things, the input of third party valuation firms and taking into account the nature and realizable value of any collateral, the portfolio company’s ability to make payments and its earnings, the markets in which the portfolio company operates, comparison to publicly traded companies, discounted cash flow, current market interest rates and other relevant factors. Because such valuations, and particularly valuations of private securities, private companies and privately owned real estate, are inherently uncertain, the valuations may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time due to changes in current market conditions. A fund’s net asset value could be adversely affected if the determinations regarding the fair value of the investments were materially higher than the values that are ultimately realized upon the disposal of such investments. These valuations could, in turn, affect the management fees or performance income that our business receives.
The use of leverage by our products may materially increase the returns of such funds but may also result in significant losses or a total loss of capital.
Our products, particularly our Direct Lending and Real Estate products, use leverage as part of their respective investment programs and in certain products regularly borrow a substantial amount of their capital.
 
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The use of leverage poses a significant degree of risk and enhances the possibility of a significant loss in the value of the investment portfolio. A fund may borrow money from time to time to purchase or carry securities or may enter into derivative transactions with counterparties that have embedded leverage. The use of leverage by our products increases the volatility of investments by magnifying the potential for gain or loss on invested equity capital. If the value of a fund’s assets were to decrease, leverage would cause net asset value to decline more sharply than it otherwise would if the fund had not employed leverage. Similarly, any decrease in the fund’s income would cause net income to decline more sharply than it would have if it had not borrowed and employed leverage. Such a decline could negatively affect the fund’s ability to service its debt, which could have a material adverse effect on our products, and as a result, on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flow.
Our private funds often rely on obtaining credit facilities secured principally by the undrawn capital commitments of their investors. These credit lines are an important part of managing the cash flow of the funds, including facilitating a fund’s acquisition or funding of investments, enhancing the regularity of cash distributions to investors and facilitating the payment of management fees to us. The inability to secure or maintain these lines of credit would have an adverse impact on our products and their returns and on us, including increasing administrative costs associated with managing a fund.
Our real estate funds are subject to the risks inherent in the ownership and operation of real estate and the construction and development of real estate.
Investments in our real estate funds will be subject to the risks inherent in the ownership and operation of real estate and real estate-related businesses and assets. These risks include the following:
 
   
general and local economic conditions;
 
   
changes in supply of and demand for competing properties in an area (as a result, for example, of overbuilding);
 
   
the financial resources of tenants;
 
   
changes in building, environmental and other laws;
 
   
energy and supply shortages;
 
   
various uninsured or uninsurable risks;
 
   
natural disasters;
 
   
changes in government regulations (such as rent control and tax laws);
 
   
changes in interest rates;
 
   
the reduced availability of mortgage funds which may render the sale or refinancing of properties difficult or impracticable;
 
   
negative developments in the economy that depress travel activity;
 
   
environmental liabilities;
 
   
contingent liabilities on disposition of assets;
 
   
unexpected cost overruns in connection with development projects; and
 
   
terrorist attacks, war (including tensions between Russia and Ukraine) and other factors that are beyond our control.
Additionally, our funds’ properties are generally self-managed by the tenant or managed by a third party, which makes us dependent upon such third parties and subjects us to risks associated with the actions of such third parties. Any of these factors may cause the value of the investments in our real estate funds to decline, which may have a material impact on our results of operations.
 
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Risks Related to our Structure and Governance
Blue Owl has elected to be treated as, a “controlled company” within the meaning of the NYSE listing standards and, as a result, our stockholders may not have certain corporate governance protections that are available to stockholders of companies that are not controlled companies.
So long as more than 50% of the voting power for the election of directors of Blue Owl is held by an individual, a group or another company, Blue Owl will qualify as a “controlled company” under the NYSE listing requirements. The Principals control a majority of the voting power of our outstanding capital stock. As a result, Blue Owl qualifies as, and has elected to be treated as, a “controlled company” under the NYSE listing standards and will not be subject to the requirements that would otherwise require us to have: (i) a majority of “independent directors,” as defined under the listing standards of the NYSE; (ii) a nominating committee comprised solely of independent directors; (iii) compensation of our executive officers determined by a majority of the independent directors or a compensation committee comprised solely of independent directors; and (iv) director nominees selected, or recommended for the Board’s selection, either by a majority of the independent directors or a nominating committee comprised solely of independent directors.
The Principals may have their interest in Blue Owl diluted due to future equity issuances or their own actions in selling Class A Shares, in each case, which could result in a loss of the “controlled company” exemption under the NYSE listing rules. Blue Owl would then be required to comply with those provisions of the NYSE listing requirements.
The multi-class structure of Blue Owl common stock has the effect of concentrating voting power with the Principals, which limits an investor’s ability to influence the outcome of important transactions, including a change in control.
Entities controlled by the Principals hold all of the issued and outstanding Class B and Class D Shares. Accordingly, until such time as the Principals own less than 25% of their aggregate ownership as of immediately after the Closing, the Principals will hold 80% of the voting power of Blue Owl’s capital stock on a fully-diluted basis and will be able to control matters submitted to our stockholders for approval, including the election of directors, amendments of our organizational documents and any merger, consolidation, sale of all or substantially all of our assets or other major corporate transactions. The Principals may have interests that differ from our stockholders and may vote in a way with which you disagree and which may be adverse to your interests. This concentrated control may have the effect of delaying, preventing or deterring a change in control of Blue Owl, could deprive our stockholders of an opportunity to receive a premium for their capital stock as part of a sale of Blue Owl, and might ultimately affect the market price of Class A Shares.
Potential conflicts of interest may arise among the holders of Class B and Class D Shares and the holders of our Class A and Class C Shares.
The Principals (and certain former employees of Dyal Capital) hold all of the Class B and Class D Shares. As a result, conflicts of interest may arise among the Principals, on the one hand, and us and our holders of our Class A and Class C Shares, on the other hand. The Principals have the ability to influence our business and affairs through their ownership of the high vote shares of our common stock, their general ability to appoint our board of directors, and provisions under the Investor Rights Agreement and our certificate of incorporation requiring their approval for certain corporate actions (in addition to approval by our board of directors). If the holders of our Class A and Class C Shares are dissatisfied with the performance of our board of directors, they have no ability to remove any of our directors, with or without cause.
Further, through their ability to elect our board of directors, the Principals have the ability to indirectly influence the determination of the amount and timing of our investments and dispositions, cash expenditures, allocation of expenses, indebtedness, issuances of additional partnership interests, tax liabilities and amounts of reserves, each of which can affect the amount of cash that is available for distribution to holders of Common Units and our Class A Shares.
 
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In addition, conflicts may arise relating to the selection, structuring and disposition of investments and other transactions, declaring dividends and other distributions and other matters due to the fact that the Principals hold their Common Units directly or through pass-through entities that are not subject to corporate income taxation.
Delaware law, our certificate of incorporation and our bylaws contain certain provisions, including anti-takeover provisions, that limit the ability of stockholders to take certain actions and could delay or discourage takeover attempts that stockholders may consider favorable.
Our certificate of incorporation and the DGCL contain provisions that could have the effect of rendering more difficult, delaying, or preventing an acquisition deemed undesirable by the Board and therefore depress the trading price of Blue Owl’s Class A Shares. These provisions could also make it difficult for stockholders to take certain actions, including electing directors who are not nominated by the current members of the Board or taking other corporate actions, including effecting changes in management. Among other things, our certificate of incorporation and bylaws include provisions regarding:
 
   
a classified board of directors with three-year staggered terms, which could delay the ability of stockholders to change the membership of a majority of the Board;
 
   
the ability of the Board to issue preferred stock, including “blank check” preferred stock and to determine the price and other terms of those shares, including preferences and voting rights, without stockholder approval, which could be used to significantly dilute the ownership of a hostile acquirer;
 
   
the limitation of the liability of, and the indemnification of, our directors and officers;
 
   
the right of the Board to elect a director to fill a vacancy created by the expansion of the Board or the resignation, death or removal of a director, which prevents stockholders from being able to fill vacancies on the Board;
 
   
the requirement that directors may only be removed from the Board for cause;
 
   
the inability of stockholders to act by written consent following the Sunset Date;
 
   
the requirement that a special meeting of stockholders may be called only by the Board, the chairman of the Board of directors or Blue Owl’s chief executive officer, which could delay the ability of stockholders to force consideration of a proposal or to take action, including the removal of directors;
 
   
controlling the procedures for the conduct and scheduling of the Board and stockholder meetings;
 
   
the ability of the Board of directors to amend the bylaws, which may allow the Board to take additional actions to prevent an unsolicited takeover and inhibit the ability of an acquirer to amend the bylaws to facilitate an unsolicited takeover attempt; and
 
   
advance notice procedures with which stockholders must comply to nominate candidates to the Board or to propose matters to be acted upon at a stockholders’ meeting, which could preclude stockholders from bringing matters before annual or special meetings of stockholders and delay changes in the composition of the Board and also may discourage or deter a potential acquirer from conducting a solicitation of proxies to elect the acquirer’s own slate of directors or otherwise attempting to obtain control of the Company.
These provisions, alone or together, could delay or prevent hostile takeovers and changes in control or changes in the Board or management.
In addition, as a Delaware corporation, the Registrant is generally subject to provisions of Delaware law, including the DGCL, although we have elected not to be governed by Section 203 of the DGCL.
Any provision of our certificate of incorporation, our bylaws or Delaware law that has the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control could limit the opportunity for stockholders to receive a premium for their shares of our capital stock and could also affect the price that some investors are willing to pay for our common stock.
 
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In addition, the provisions of the Investor Rights Agreement, as described below, provide the stockholders party thereto with certain board representation and other consent rights that could also have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control.
Our certificate of incorporation designates the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware as the sole and exclusive forum for certain types of actions and proceedings that may be initiated by our stockholders, which could limit our stockholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us or our directors, officers or other employees.
Our certificate of incorporation provides that, unless we consent in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, (a) any derivative action or proceeding brought on behalf of us, (b) any action asserting a claim of breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any current or former director, officer, other employee, agent or stockholder of Blue Owl to Blue Owl or our stockholders, or any claim for aiding and abetting such alleged breach, (c) any action asserting a claim against us or any of our current or former directors, officers, other employees, agents or stockholders (i) arising pursuant to any provision of the DGCL, our certificate of incorporation (as it may be amended or restated) or our bylaws or (ii) as to which the DGCL confers jurisdiction on the Delaware Court of Chancery or (d) any action asserting a claim against us or any of our current or former directors, officers, other employees, agents or stockholders governed by the internal affairs doctrine of the law of the State of Delaware shall, as to any action in the foregoing clauses (a) through (b), to the fullest extent permitted by law, be solely and exclusively brought in the Delaware Court of Chancery; provided, however, that the foregoing shall not apply to any claim (1) as to which the Delaware Court of Chancery determines that there is an indispensable party not subject to the jurisdiction of the Delaware Court of Chancery (and the indispensable party does not consent to the personal jurisdiction of the Court of Chancery within ten days following such determination), (2) which is vested in the exclusive jurisdiction of a court or forum other than the Delaware Court of Chancery, or (3) arising under federal securities laws, including the Securities Act as to which the federal district courts of the United States of America shall, to the fullest extent permitted by law, be the sole and exclusive forum. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the provisions of Article XIII of our certificate of incorporation does not apply to suits brought to enforce any liability or duty created by the Exchange Act, or any other claim for which the federal district courts of the United States of America shall be the sole and exclusive forum.
This
choice-of-forum
provision may limit a stockholder’s ability to bring a claim in a judicial forum that it finds favorable for disputes with us or our or its directors, officers, stockholders, agents or other employees, which may discourage such lawsuits. Alternatively, if a court were to find this provision of our certificate of incorporation inapplicable or unenforceable with respect to one or more of the specified types of actions or proceedings, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving such matters in other jurisdictions, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations and result in a diversion of the time and resources of management and our board of directors.
The Registrant is a holding company and its only material source of cash is its indirect interest (held through Blue Owl GP) in the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships, and it is accordingly dependent upon distributions made by its subsidiaries to pay taxes, cause Blue Owl GP to make payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement, and pay dividends.
The Registrant is a holding company with no material assets other than its indirect ownership of the GP Units through Blue Owl GP and certain deferred tax assets that arose in connection with the purchase of Common Units with proceeds from the Business Combination. As a result, the Registrant has no independent means of generating revenue or cash flow. The Registrant’s ability to pay taxes, cause Blue Owl GP to make payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement, and pay dividends will depend on the financial results and cash flows of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships and the distributions it receives (directly or indirectly) from the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships. Deterioration in the financial condition, earnings or cash flow of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships for any reason could limit or impair the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships’ ability to pay such distributions. Additionally, to the extent that the Registrant or Blue Owl GP needs funds and the Blue Owl
 
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Operating Partnerships are restricted from making such distributions under applicable law or regulation or under the terms of any financing arrangements, or the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships are otherwise unable to provide such funds, it could materially adversely affect Blue Owl’s liquidity and financial condition.
Subject to the discussion herein, the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships will continue to be treated as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes and, as such, generally will not be subject to any entity-level U.S. federal income tax. Instead, taxable income will be allocated to holders of Common Units and GP Units. Accordingly, Blue Owl GP will be required to pay income taxes on its allocable share of any net taxable income of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships. Under the terms of the Blue Owl Limited Partnership Agreements, the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships are obligated to make tax distributions to holders of the Common Units and GP Units calculated at certain assumed tax rates. In addition to tax expenses, Blue Owl will also incur expenses related to its operations, including Blue Owl GP’s payment obligations under the Tax Receivable Agreement, which could be significant, and some of which will be reimbursed by the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships (excluding payment obligations under the Tax Receivable Agreement). Blue Owl intends to cause Blue Owl GP to cause the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships to make ordinary distributions and tax distributions to holders of the Common Units and GP units on a pro rata basis in amounts sufficient to cover all applicable taxes, relevant operating expenses, payments by Blue Owl GP under the Tax Receivable Agreement and dividends, if any, declared by Blue Owl. However, as discussed above, the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships’ ability to make such distributions may be subject to various limitations and restrictions including, but not limited to, retention of amounts necessary to satisfy the obligations of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships and restrictions on distributions that would violate any applicable restrictions contained in the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships’ debt agreements, or any applicable law, or that would have the effect of rendering the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships insolvent. To the extent that Blue Owl GP is unable to make payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement for any reason, such payments will be deferred and will accrue interest until paid; provided, however, that nonpayment for a specified period may constitute a breach of a material obligation under the Tax Receivable Agreement and therefore accelerate payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement, which could be substantial.
Additionally, although the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships generally will not be subject to any entity-level U.S. federal income tax, they may be liable under recent U.S. federal tax legislation for adjustments to prior year tax returns, absent an election to the contrary. In the event the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships’ calculations of taxable income are incorrect, the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships and/or their partners, including the Registrant or Blue Owl GP, in later years may be subject to material liabilities pursuant to this legislation and its related guidance.
If either of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships were treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax or state tax purposes, then the amount available for distribution by such Blue Owl Operating Partnerships could be substantially reduced and the value of the Registrant’s shares could be adversely affected.
An entity that would otherwise be classified as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes (such as either of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships) may nonetheless be treated as, and taxable as, a corporation if it is a “publicly traded partnership” unless an exception to such treatment applies. An entity that would otherwise be classified as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes will be treated as a “publicly traded partnership” if interests in such entity are traded on an established securities market or interests in such entity are readily tradable on a secondary market or the substantial equivalent thereof. If either of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships were determined to be treated as a “publicly traded partnership” (and taxable as a corporation) for U.S. federal income tax purposes, such Blue Owl Operating Partnership would be taxable on its income at the U.S. federal income tax rates applicable to corporations and distributions by such Blue Owl Operating Partnership to its partners (including Blue Owl GP) could be taxable as dividends to such partners to the extent of the earnings and profits of such Blue Owl Operating Partnership. In addition, we would no longer have the benefit of increases in the tax basis of the Blue Owl Operating Partnership’s assets as a result of exchanges of Common Units. Pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, certain Blue Owl equity holders may, from time to time, subject to the terms of the Exchange Agreement, exchange their interests in the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships
 
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and have such interests redeemed by Blue Owl Operating Partnerships for cash or the Registrant’s stock. While such exchanges could be treated as trading in the interests of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships for purposes of testing “publicly traded partnership” status, the Exchange Agreement contains restrictions on redemptions and exchanges of interests in the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships that are intended to prevent either of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships from being treated as a “publicly traded partnership” for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Such restrictions are designed to comply with certain safe harbors provided for under applicable U.S. federal income tax law. Blue Owl GP may also impose additional restrictions on exchanges that the Registrant or Blue Owl GP determines to be necessary or advisable so that neither of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships is treated as a “publicly traded partnership” for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Accordingly, while such position is not free from doubt, each of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships is expected to be operated such that it is not treated as a “publicly traded partnership” taxable as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes and we intend to take the position that neither of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships is so treated as a result of exchanges of its interests pursuant to the Exchange Agreement.
Pursuant to the Tax Receivable Agreement, Blue Owl GP will be required to make payments to certain equity holders for certain tax benefits the Registrant and Blue Owl GP may claim and those payments may be substantial.
Certain equity holders may in the future exchange their Common Units, together with the cancellation of an equal number of Class C Shares or Class D Shares, for Class A Shares or Class B Shares, respectively, or cash pursuant to the Blue Owl Operating Partnership Agreements and the Exchange Agreement, subject to certain conditions and transfer restrictions as set forth therein and in the Investor Rights Agreement. Additionally, Blue Owl GP may acquire from certain former Owl Rock equity holders corporations formed by such former Owl Rock equity holders to hold partnership interests in Owl Rock. Such transactions are expected to result in increases in the Registrant’s (and Blue Owl GP’s) allocable share of the tax basis of the tangible and intangible assets of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships. These increases in tax basis may increase (for income tax purposes) depreciation and amortization deductions and therefore reduce the amount of income or franchise tax that the Registrant or Blue Owl GP would otherwise be required to pay in the future had such sales and exchanges never occurred.
In connection with the Business Combination, Blue Owl GP entered into the Tax Receivable Agreement, which generally provides for the payment by it of 85% of certain tax benefits, if any, that Blue Owl GP realizes (or in certain cases is deemed to realize) as a result of these increases in tax basis and certain other tax attributes of Blue Owl GP, the corporations acquired from certain former Owl Rock equity holders in the transaction, and tax benefits related to entering into the Tax Receivable Agreement. Those payments are the obligation of Blue Owl (including Blue Owl GP) and not of Blue Owl Operating Partnerships. The actual increase in Blue Owl GP’s allocable share of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships’ tax basis in their assets, as well as the amount and timing of any payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement, will vary depending upon a number of factors, including the timing of exchanges, the market price of the Class A Shares at the time of the exchange, the extent to which such exchanges are taxable and the amount and timing of the recognition of the Registrant’s (and Blue Owl GP’s) income. While many of the factors that will determine the amount of payments that Blue Owl GP will make under the Tax Receivable Agreement are outside of its control, Blue Owl GP expects that the payments it will make under the Tax Receivable Agreement will be substantial and could have a material adverse effect on Blue Owl’s financial condition. Any payments made by Blue Owl GP under the Tax Receivable Agreement will generally reduce the amount of overall cash flow that might have otherwise been available to the Registrant and Blue Owl GP. To the extent that Blue Owl GP is unable to make timely payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement for any reason, the unpaid amounts will be deferred and will accrue interest until paid; however, nonpayment for a specified period may constitute a breach of a material obligation under the Tax Receivable Agreement and therefore accelerate payments due under the Tax Receivable Agreement, as further described below. Furthermore, Blue Owl GP’s future obligation to make payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement could make Blue Owl a less attractive target for an acquisition, particularly in the case of an acquirer that cannot
 
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use some or all of the tax benefits that may be realized or deemed realized under the Tax Receivable Agreement. See the section entitled “Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions—Tax Receivable Agreement.”
In certain cases, payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement may exceed the actual tax benefits
t
he Registrant or Blue Owl GP realizes or be accelerated.
Payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement will be based on the tax reporting positions that the Registrant or Blue Owl GP determines, and the IRS or another taxing authority may challenge all or any part of the tax basis increases, as well as other tax positions that the Registrant or Blue Owl GP takes, and a court may sustain such a challenge. In the event that any tax benefits initially claimed by the Registrant or Blue Owl GP are disallowed, the former Owl Rock and Dyal Capital equityholders will not be required to reimburse the Registrant or Blue Owl GP for any excess payments that may previously have been made under the Tax Receivable Agreement, for example, due to adjustments resulting from examinations by taxing authorities. Rather, excess payments made to such holders will be netted against any future cash payments otherwise required to be made by Blue Owl GP under the Tax Receivable Agreement, if any, after the determination of such excess. However, a challenge to any tax benefits initially claimed by the Registrant or Blue Owl GP may not arise for a number of years following the initial time of such payment or, even if challenged early, such excess cash payment may be greater than the amount of future cash payments that Blue Owl GP might otherwise be required to make under the terms of the Tax Receivable Agreement and, as a result, there might not be future cash payments against which to net. As a result, in certain circumstances Blue Owl GP could make payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement in excess of Blue Owl’s or Blue Owl GP’s actual income or franchise tax savings, which could materially impair Blue Owl’s financial condition.
Moreover, the Tax Receivable Agreement provides that, in certain events, including a change of control, breach of a material obligation under the Tax Receivable Agreement, or Blue Owl GP’s exercise of early termination rights, Blue Owl GP’s obligations under the Tax Receivable Agreement will accelerate and Blue Owl GP will be required to make a
lump-sum
cash payment to the former Owl Rock and Dyal Capital equityholders and other applicable parties to the Tax Receivable Agreement equal to the present value of all forecasted future payments that would have otherwise been made under the Tax Receivable Agreement, which
lump-sum
payment would be based on certain assumptions, including those relating to Blue Owl GP’s future taxable income. The
lump-sum
payment could be substantial and could exceed the actual tax benefits that the Registrant or Blue Owl GP realizes subsequent to such payment because such payment would be calculated assuming, among other things, that the Registrant and Blue Owl GP would have certain tax benefits available to it and that the Registrant and Blue Owl GP would be able to use the potential tax benefits in future years.
There may be a material negative effect on the Registrant’s liquidity if the payments required to be made by Blue Owl GP under the Tax Receivable Agreement exceed the actual income or franchise tax savings that the Registrant (or Blue Owl GP) realizes. Furthermore, Blue Owl GP’s obligations to make payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement could also have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing certain mergers, asset sales, other forms of business combinations or other changes of control.
Adverse developments in U.S. and
non-U.S.
tax laws could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Our effective tax rate and the amount of “tax distributions” that the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships are required to make to equity holders could also change materially as a result of various evolving factors, including changes in income tax law resulting from the most recent U.S. presidential and congressional elections or changes in the scope of our operations.
The Registrant is subject to U.S. federal income taxation, and the Registrant and the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships and their subsidiaries are subject to income taxation by certain states and municipalities and certain foreign jurisdictions in which they operate. In addition, the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships are required to make tax distributions to their partners pursuant to the Blue Owl Limited Partnership Agreements. In determining our tax liability and obligation to make tax distributions, we must monitor changes to the applicable tax laws and
 
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related regulations. While our existing operations have been implemented in a manner we believe is in compliance with current prevailing laws, one or more taxing U.S. or
non-U.S.
jurisdictions could seek to impose incremental, retroactive, or new taxes on us. In addition, the current U.S. presidential administration has called for changes to fiscal and tax policies, which may include comprehensive tax reform. These and other tax laws and related regulation changes, to the extent adopted, may increase tax uncertainty and/or our effective tax rate, result in higher compliance cost and result in a corresponding increase in the amount of payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement and/or a corresponding increase in the tax distributions that the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships will be required to make. In addition, there may be changes in law related to the Base Erosion and Profit Shifting Project of the Organization for Economic
Co-Operation
and Development (“OECD”), the European Commission’s state aid investigations and other initiatives. Such changes may include (but are not limited to) the taxation of operating income, investment income, dividends received or (in the specific context of withholding tax) dividends paid, or the taxation of partnerships and other pass-through entities. Any adverse developments in these and other U.S. or foreign laws or regulations, including legislative changes, judicial holdings or administrative interpretations, could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Finally, changes in the scope of our operations, including expansion to new geographies, could increase the amount of taxes to which we are subject, and could increase our effective tax rate, which could similarly adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
Reports published by analysts, including projections in those reports that differ from our actual results, could adversely affect the price and trading volume of our Class A Shares.
Securities research analysts may establish and publish their own periodic projections for Blue Owl from time to time. Those projections may vary widely and may not accurately predict the results we actually achieve. Our share price may decline if our actual results do not match the projections of these securities research analysts. Similarly, if one or more of the analysts who write reports on us downgrades our stock or publishes inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our share price could decline. In addition, securities research analysts may compare Blue Owl to companies that are not appropriately comparable, which could lead to lower than expected valuations. If one or more analysts cease coverage of us or fail to publish reports on us regularly, our share price or trading volume could decline.
The Blue Owl Operating Partnerships may directly or indirectly make distributions of cash to us substantially in excess of the amounts we use to make distributions to our stockholders and pay our expenses (including our taxes and payments by Blue Owl GP under the Tax Receivable Agreement). To the extent we do not distribute such excess cash as dividends to our stockholders, the direct or indirect holders of Common Units would benefit from any value attributable to such cash as a result of their ownership of our stock upon an exchange of their Common Units.
Blue Owl GP receives a pro rata portion of any distributions made by the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships. Any cash received from such distributions is first be used to satisfy any tax liability and then used to make any payments required to be made by Blue Owl GP under the Tax Receivable Agreement. Subject to having available cash and subject to limitations imposed by applicable law and contractual restrictions, the Blue Owl Operating Group Agreements require the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships to make certain distributions to holders of Common Units and to Blue Owl GP pro rata to facilitate the payment of taxes with respect to the income of the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships that is allocated to them. To the extent that the tax distributions we directly or indirectly receive exceed the amounts we actually require to pay taxes, Tax Receivable Agreement payments and other expenses (which is likely to be the case given that the assumed tax rate for such distributions will generally exceed our effective tax rate), we will not be required to distribute such excess cash. Our board of directors may, in its sole discretion, choose to use such excess cash for certain purposes, including to make distributions to the holders of our stock. Unless and until our board of directors chooses, in its sole discretion, to declare a distribution, we will have no obligation to distribute such cash (or other available cash other than any declared dividend) to our stockholders.
 
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No adjustments to the exchange ratio of Common Units for shares of our common stock will be made as a result of either (i) any cash distribution by us or (ii) any cash that we retain and do not distribute to our stockholders. To the extent we do not distribute such cash as dividends and instead, for example, hold such cash balances or use such cash for certain other purposes, this may result in shares of our stock increasing in value relative to the Common Units. The holders of Common Units may benefit from any value attributable to such cash balances if they acquire shares of our stock in an exchange of Common Units.
Risks Related to Our Class A Shares
An active trading market for our Class A Shares may not be sustained, which may make it difficult to sell the Class A Shares you purchase.
Our Class A Shares are currently listed on the NYSE under the symbol “OWL.” However, we cannot assure you that an active trading market for our Class A Shares will be sustained. Accordingly, we cannot assure you of the likelihood that an active trading market for our Class A Shares will be maintained, the liquidity of any trading market, your ability to sell your Class A Shares when desired or the prices that you may obtain for your shares.
The market price and trading volume of our Class A Shares may be volatile, which could result in rapid and substantial losses for holders of our Class A Shares.
The market price of our Class A Shares is likely to be highly volatile and may be subject to wide fluctuations in response to a variety of factors. In addition, the volume of trading in our Class A Shares may fluctuate and cause significant price variations to occur. If the market price of our Class A Shares declines significantly, holders of our Class A Shares may be unable to resell their shares at or above their purchase price, if at all. Some of the factors that could negatively affect the price of our Class A Shares or result in fluctuations in the price or trading volume of shares of our Class A Shares include:
 
   
the impact of
COVID-19
pandemic on Blue Owl’s business;
 
   
the inability to recognize the anticipated benefits of the Business Combination, which may be affected by, among other things, competition, Blue Owl’s inability to grow and manage growth profitably, and retain its key employees;
 
   
adverse market reaction to any indebtedness we may incur or securities we may issue in the future;
 
   
changes in market valuations of similar companies;
 
   
speculation in the press or investment community;
 
   
a lack of liquidity in the trading of our Class A Shares;
 
   
changes in applicable laws or regulations;
 
   
risks relating to the uncertainty of Blue Owl’s projected financial information; and
 
   
risks related to the organic and inorganic growth of Blue Owl’s business and the timing of expected business milestones.
In addition, the stock markets have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have affected and continue to affect the market prices of equity securities of many companies. These fluctuations have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of those companies. Broad market and industry factors, as well as general economic, political, regulatory and market conditions, may negatively affect the market price of our Class A Shares, regardless of Blue Owl’s actual operating performance.
Volatility in our share price could subject us to securities class action litigation.
In the past, securities class action litigation has often been brought against a company following a decline in the market price of its securities. If we face such litigation, it could result in substantial costs and a diversion of management’s attention and resources, which could harm its business.
 
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If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about us, or publish negative reports, our stock price and trading volume could decline.
The trading market for our Class A Shares will depend, in part, on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us. We do not have any control over these analysts. If our financial performance fails to meet analyst estimates or one or more of the analysts who cover our performance downgrade our common stock or change their opinion, our stock price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of us or fail to regularly publish reports on our performance, it could lose visibility in the financial markets, which could cause our stock price or trading volume to decline.
Future offerings of debt or offerings or issuances of equity securities by us may adversely affect the market price of our Class A Shares or otherwise dilute all other stockholders.
In the future, we may attempt to obtain financing or to further increase our capital resources by issuing additional Class A Shares or offering debt or other equity securities, including commercial paper, medium-term notes, senior or subordinated notes, debt securities convertible into equity or preferred stock. We also expect to grant equity awards to employees, directors, and consultants under stock incentive plans. Future acquisitions could require substantial additional capital in excess of cash from operations. We would expect to obtain the capital required for acquisitions through a combination of additional issuances of equity, corporate indebtedness and/or cash from operations.
Issuing additional Class A Shares or other equity securities or securities convertible into equity may dilute the economic and voting rights of our existing stockholders or reduce the market price of our Class A Shares or both. Upon liquidation, holders of such debt securities and preferred stock, if issued, and lenders with respect to other borrowings would receive a distribution of our available assets prior to the holders of our Class A Shares. Debt securities convertible into equity could be subject to adjustments in the conversion ratio pursuant to which certain events may increase the number of equity securities issuable upon conversion. Preferred stock, if issued, could have a preference with respect to liquidating distributions or a preference with respect to dividend payments that could limit our ability to pay dividends to the holders of our Class A Shares. Our decision to issue securities in any future offering will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, which may adversely affect the amount, timing and nature of our future offerings.
 
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USE OF PROCEEDS
All of the Class A Shares offered by the Selling Holders pursuant to this prospectus will be sold by Selling Holders for their respective accounts. We will not receive any of the proceeds from these sales.
The Selling Holders will pay any underwriting discounts and commissions and expenses incurred by the Selling Holders for brokerage, accounting, tax or legal services or any other expenses incurred by the Selling Holders in disposing of the securities. We will bear the costs, fees and expenses incurred in effecting the registration of the securities covered by this prospectus, including all registration and filing fees, NYSE listing fees and fees and expenses of our counsel and our independent registered public accounting firm.
 
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DIVIDEND POLICY
It shall be the policy of the Company to pay to holders of classes of outstanding Class A and Class B Shares a quarterly dividend representing approximately 85% of the Company’s share of Distributable Earnings for the most recently completed fiscal quarter, subject to approval of the board of directors and adjustment by amounts determined by the board of directors to be necessary or appropriate to provide for the conduct of the Company’s business, to make appropriate investments in the Company’s business and funds, to comply with applicable law, any of the Company’s debt instruments or other agreements, or to provide for future cash requirements such
as tax-related payments,
operating reserves, clawback obligations and dividends to stockholders for any ensuing quarter.
We intend to continue to pay to Class A Stockholders (and Class B Stockholders in the future to the extent any Class B Shares are outstanding) a quarterly dividend representing approximately 85% of Distributable Earnings following the end of each quarter. Blue Owl Capital Inc.’s share of Distributable Earnings, subject to adjustment as determined by our Board to be necessary or appropriate to provide for the conduct of our business, to make appropriate investments in our business and products, to comply with applicable law, any of our debt instruments or other agreements, or to provide for future cash requirements such as
tax-related
payments, operating reserves, clawback obligations and dividends to stockholders for any ensuing quarter. All of the foregoing is subject to the qualification that the declaration and payment of any dividends are at the sole discretion of our Board, and our Board may change our dividend policy at any time, including, without limitation, to reduce or eliminate dividends entirely.
The Blue Owl Operating Partnerships Tax Distributions to the partners of such partnerships, including to Blue Owl GP, if we determine that the taxable income of the relevant partnership will give rise to taxable income for its partners. Generally, Tax Distributions will be computed based on our estimate of the taxable income of the relevant partnership allocable to a partner multiplied by an assumed tax rate equal to the highest effective marginal combined U.S. federal, New York State and New York City income tax rates prescribed for an individual or corporate resident in New York City (taking into account certain assumptions set forth in the relevant partnership agreements). Tax Distributions will be made only to the extent distributions from the Blue Owl Operating Partnerships for the relevant year were otherwise insufficient to cover the estimated assumed tax liabilities.
Holders of our Class A and B Shares may not always receive distributions or may receive lower distributions on a per share basis at a time when we, indirectly through Blue Owl GP, and holders of our Common Units are receiving distributions on their interests, as distributions to the Registrant and Blue Owl GP may be used to settle tax and TRA liabilities, if any, and other obligations.
Dividends are expected to be treated as qualified dividends under current law to the extent of the Company’s current and accumulated earnings and profits, with any excess dividends treated as a return of capital to the extent of a stockholder’s basis, and any remaining excess generally treated as gain realized on the sale or other disposition of stock.
 
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BUSINESS OF BLUE OWL
“We”, “us” and “our” generally refer to Blue Owl Capital Inc., a Delaware corporation (together with its subsidiaries, “Blue Owl”) unless the context otherwise requires.
Our Company
Bl